10 Recent Topics:

Waterville expansion  by Bkroon9175, Jul 29, 2014 - 2:22 PM GMT - 7 Replies

NELSAP Areas on Street View  by mapnut, Jul 29, 2014 - 1:22 PM GMT - 4 Replies

EB-5 Issues Brewing at Jay Peak  by tom white, Jul 29, 2014 - 1:10 PM GMT - 1 Replies

Sunapee Court Ruling  by tom white, Jul 29, 2014 - 11:22 AM GMT - 26 Replies

Guess This Open Area #25  by newenglandskier13, Jul 29, 2014 - 11:08 AM GMT - 0 Replies

Vanity plates w/ski theme  by flbski, Jul 29, 2014 - 5:02 AM GMT - 34 Replies

PCMR v. Talisker: judge will sign eviction order, demands mediation  by intlski, Jul 28, 2014 - 6:36 PM GMT - 19 Replies

State finally gives Tupper Lake approval  by NewYorkSkier17, Jul 28, 2014 - 4:19 PM GMT - 34 Replies

Gondola Cabin Style  by bousquet19, Jul 28, 2014 - 2:44 PM GMT - 10 Replies

New "Glade" Skiing at Stowe/Mt. Mansfield  by newenglandskier13, Jul 28, 2014 - 11:05 AM GMT - 9 Replies
 
 

 
  60 guests
2 members

Welcome Anonymous



Members logged in:

newenglandskier13
marcski
 
 
NELSAP.org | SkiMaps.com
 
 
Member Login
USER:   PASS:   Remember me  
Create new account | Lost password?
 
 
Home

Forums : NELSAP Discussion : NELSAP Discussion
Moderated by: Chris, nelsap, Betsy, the_hop

Anonymous posts are not allowed in this forum

din settings

Page: 1 
Author Post
atomic68
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Aug 06, 2004

Posts: 1020

Location:



Posted: Mar 06, 2006 - 9:55 PM GMT
Edited: Mar 06, 2006 - 9:57 PM GMT

just got new skis and told them the wrong skier type- told them I when I meant III...it occured to me when i rented for my son this weekend- probably a stupid question but. Do I need to adress this? ...... I dont ski too Fast any more but i do ski hard, I just turn more...i do bumps ...steeps.... I think its now set at 7, was at I believe 9 before but i was heavier and gave correct info (type III).....was 165, now 145, 5 ft 8, age 37 ???




Bonus trivia: DIN stands for: Deutsche Industrie Norm

__________
shenty
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Oct 17, 2005

Posts: 914

Location:
Bedford NH - New London, NH



Posted: Mar 06, 2006 - 10:18 PM GMT

I would get it set to the proper DIN before you use those skis. The last thing you need is for the ski to release prematurely and injuring yourself.

A hurt atomic68 would make us sad

__________
There's no waiting for friends on a powder day.
riverc0il
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Jan 05, 2002

Posts: 3263

Location:
Ashland, NH



Posted: Mar 06, 2006 - 10:28 PM GMT

Quote:
I would get it set to the proper DIN before you use those skis. The last thing you need is for the ski to release prematurely and injuring yourself.

i will agree with that, from experience unfortunately.

__________
TheSnowWay.com
moe
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Aug 14, 2003

Posts: 539

Location:
Back to MA



Posted: Mar 06, 2006 - 10:28 PM GMT

definitely check them out! the last thing you want to do is ride on something that could fail and pre-release.

__________
Do not drink Pepsi, do not eat M&M's, because they are the tools of Babylon.
polaroid
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Jan 10, 2006

Posts: 107

Location:


Posted: Mar 06, 2006 - 10:52 PM GMT

Since I used to be a certified binding technician, I would not advise you on what your settings should be. However, 9 would be a rather high setting for someone your size and skier profile. You don't want to be near the limit of the DIN range of your binding, either. Now, the recommended DIN settings don't always fit the skier, especially if he participates in rather odd skiing situations. I knew a previous owner of the Blue Hills ski area who kept his bindings on the lowest settings since he got hit so many times around the lodge. If you are hit by another person, you want to be on a low setting. Recently I was hit by a snowboarder and was skiing with one binding which I had backed off considerably and one which was higher than the recommended setting. I injured the leg that was on the ski with the recommended setting which didn't allow the binding to release. Futhermore, most men over-estimate their abilities at skiing (and in general). You prabably aren't in catagory III. The whole process of setting binding spring tension in an indemnified shop works to protect the shop and manufacturer from law suits. It isn't there to verify your claims at prowess, etc. Only once did I set a binding against the recommended setting for someone else. It was a guy who was over 80 and had been a participant in the '32 Olympics at Lake Placid. He came into my shop and told me that another shop had set his bindings too low and he was coming out of them. There's an exception to every rule.
WoodCore
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Jan 13, 2002

Posts: 3164

Location:
CT



Posted: Mar 07, 2006 - 12:54 AM GMT

Quote:
just got new skis and told them the wrong skier type- told them I when I meant III...it occured to me when i rented for my son this weekend- probably a stupid question but. Do I need to adress this? ...... I dont ski too Fast any more but i do ski hard, I just turn more...i do bumps ...steeps.... I think its now set at 7, was at I believe 9 before but i was heavier and gave correct info (type III).....was 165, now 145, 5 ft 8, age 37 ???


A DIN setting of 7 sounds about right for your ability and body stats, but DIN settings mean nothing if the forward pressure is not correctly set.

I'm curious, when you picked up your new skis, did the shop simulate a binding release for you?

__________
"Freedom often leads, but responsibility always follows close behind."
skipatrol40s
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Apr 29, 2002

Posts: 1493

Location:



Posted: Mar 07, 2006 - 1:36 AM GMT

I broke my left tibia and fibula when I was 14 years old. I was young and stupid. I set my own binding DIN. I didn't want the ski to come off because I was a tough guy. Dumb real dumb. Anyway I ended up almost as bad as Rich's broken leg story

BTW - your din setting depends a lot on boot size. The bigger the boot the small the DIN. Seems backwards but that is the way it works. Go figure.

Moral of the story get your bindings checked by a reputable ski shop every year and save the receipt for that big law suite when the stupid other skier/snowboarder hits you and does serious bodily damage.
rstuthill
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Apr 03, 2005

Posts: 1782

Location:
Bolton, CT


Posted: Mar 07, 2006 - 2:15 AM GMT

I'm 225 and ski pretty hard and fast. I have my bindings set at 9 and have never skied out of them. Yet they have released exactly when I wanted them to. Coupla big crashes, and some slower speed things which are actually more risky.

I'm guessing that 9 is quite a bit too high for you. Six or seven would be more like it. Maybe even 5.
rickbolger
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Mar 14, 2005

Posts: 2726

Location:
Great Gorge, NJ



Posted: Mar 07, 2006 - 2:28 AM GMT
Edited: Mar 07, 2006 - 2:31 AM GMT

I've done my own settings over the years, never a problem until my first pre-release. Black diamond, warp speed, right next to a lift tower. I launched downhill, fortunately legs behind me. I twisted, bounced off my shoulder, launched up, landed on my back and whacked my head neck and shoulders on the snow, saw stars, then slid like a toboggan for another 40 yards until the trail flattened out. Considering all the things that could've happened, I felt very fortunate. Now I spend the extra dough to get the bindings adjusted and the weight release set. I think my problem was that I didn't have the forward pressure set correctly, and smacking my head on the snow knocked a bit of sense into me.

That being said, if I were trying to get you onto the snow in a pinch, and not knowing your boot length it's hard to say exactly, but I would say a 7 is a setting for a fairly aggressive skier at your height and weight. So something seems a little weird if you told him you were a Type I. Figuring on an average 290 mm boot length a type I would be something 4.75 to 5.5. How many beers did you have? Never mind. Since the shop set it, I would go with it.

A friend of mine, a little nutty, gets the shop to adjust his bindings. When he gets home he takes out a screwdriver and maxes 'em out. He turns them right to the highest setting (12 on his bindings) because he says "I don't want them coming off, ever."
skipatrol40s
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Apr 29, 2002

Posts: 1493

Location:



Posted: Mar 07, 2006 - 11:40 AM GMT

Quote:
A friend of mine, a little nutty, gets the shop to adjust his bindings. When he gets home he takes out a screwdriver and maxes 'em out. He turns them right to the highest setting (12 on his bindings) because he says "I don't want them coming off, ever."
Yeah that is what I said at 14. Bad mistake. Have your friend read Rich's broken leg story.

Jonni
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Oct 12, 2001

Posts: 2355

Location:
Sunapee, NH & South Burlington, VT



Posted: Mar 07, 2006 - 12:46 PM GMT

I agree with all above comments. Take them to a ski shop for a routine tune up and have them recheck the DIN for you right down to your skier type, height and weight, etc. I have a pretty good idea what my DIN ratio should be (around a 7 or but I always have the ski shop calculate it for me when I demo skis.

__________
Fall Line n. Imaginary line following the most direct path down a slope that skiers continuously traverse on a run, often stopping at other invisible slope features along the way like the Tumble Lane, the Stagger Path and the Topple Zone.
dirk109
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Nov 21, 2001

Posts: 1111

Location:
Londonderry, VT


Posted: Mar 07, 2006 - 1:30 PM GMT

While on the topic, Do you know that DIN (Deutsche Industrie Norm) is like saying Metric? In todays lawyer chasing would, A good shop will NEVER or try NEVER to say DIN.....

While chatting with the Winterstiger rep, He told me that if the shop were ever brought to court and the shop owner/employee ever said DIN, The lawyer would laugh and say "Since when were we in Germany?"
atomic68
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Aug 06, 2004

Posts: 1020

Location:



Posted: Mar 07, 2006 - 2:02 PM GMT
Edited: Mar 07, 2006 - 2:10 PM GMT

THANK YOU ALL !!!!
Woodcore- No, they didnt simulate a release...in fact they didnt even give me "that" receipt, or take my receipt for ski pickup- I walked in and they remebered me and just went and got my skis- (and i was worried they werent going to give them to me at all having paid cash ....another story entirely...this is Massachusetts afterall)


I did ski them once, no problems, I did hit it kinda hard but it was powdery and not steep.... and may go again 1 more time but it wil be a real mellow night just me and my 7 year old at skiward maybe tomorroe night...... I am cluless on this binding setting stuff ,,,,the front "appears" to be at 7...the back I cant even see...I have no idea which is the din and which is the rear release, or weight release or vice versa????.... funny thing is also..... i brought them to the shop yesterday at lunch break before i posted here ,but they were closed from 10-2, taking a 4 hour lunch I guess.... no Rick i wasnt drinking when i did this deal, it was lunch time, i ate a salad ....im surprised the shop didnt question anything either

__________
alpental07
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Jan 18, 2007

Posts: 2

Location:


Posted: Feb 02, 2007 - 12:53 AM GMT

There is one piece of crucial info that is needed to calculate your binding's DIN setting that you left out - your boot sole length (measured in millimeters).

The 20 lbs you lost will mean you need to adjust to DIN down about 1.25.

However, you should always get a professional technician to torque test the binding before use. This is because the tension springs wear over time and the binding will release differently (i.e. a technician may set the binding at a 9, but your DIN according to the charts is 7 - this is because the springs are worn and a setting of 9 is releasing more like a 7)

Again, I think you should always have a torque test, but a reference to calculate your DIN is www.DINsetting.com
weedywart
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Jan 23, 2007

Posts: 166

Location:



Posted: Feb 02, 2007 - 11:43 AM GMT
Edited: Feb 02, 2007 - 12:13 PM GMT

Quote:
While on the topic, Do you know that DIN (Deutsche Industrie Norm) is like saying Metric? In todays lawyer chasing would, A good shop will NEVER or try NEVER to say DIN.....

While chatting with the Winterstiger rep, He told me that if the shop were ever brought to court and the shop owner/employee ever said DIN, The lawyer would laugh and say "Since when were we in Germany?"
That's a bunch of non-sense. It's like thinking that BTU figures won't be accepted in a court of law because they are British. DIN is recognized by all ski binding manufacturers as the norm. Since there are so few of them agreement is universal. Binding techs go through a certification process by the manufacturers which permits them to indemnify their bindings for use. You're going to have a hard time getting money out of the international corporations that own binding manufacturer's with that lawyer.
Quote:
just got new skis and told them the wrong skier type- told them I when I meant III...it occured to me when i rented for my son this weekend- probably a stupid question but. Do I need to adress this? ...... I dont ski too Fast any more but i do ski hard, I just turn more...i do bumps ...steeps.... I think its now set at 7, was at I believe 9 before but i was heavier and gave correct info (type III).....was 165, now 145, 5 ft 8, age 37 ???

First of all I worked as a binding tech. I'm not giving you any advice except that you should take it back to the shop that you had it adjusted in and talk to them. If they set the binding and you ski on it you aren't liable. If you change the setting, they no longer are liable. If I give you advice such as posting that 9 is too high and you don't change the setting or go into the shop then you could try and sue me about it. That's a much harder case to carry through to compensation than if you have an indemnified binding tech change the setting and you sue them. However, I think after learning a bit about the situation that Arnold Swarzenneger (or is it Swartzenneger) had his binding set at a DIN that was too high. He prabably optained co-operation from someone in a shop. In rare case exceptions to the rules are made. I always set my own bindings beginning a season because the binding will last longer if you back the pressure off of the spring in the off season. This has led to some tricky situations for me, though, and I don't recommend doing it. Once I was out in Utah and forgot to reset my binding before riding the lift to the summit. I skied off the lift and immediately came out of the binding. Then, while it was snowing I had to set the binding while my skiing partners waited.
tynyro
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Nov 04, 2008

Posts: 1

Location:


Posted: Nov 04, 2008 - 9:21 AM GMT

DIN settings are very important because they prevent bad injuries.DIN settings means how easly your skies jump when tou fall.There many parameters that help you to select your ski settings like:height,weight.lenght of your boots in (mm),and your skier type.There is a small software has 567 Kb that can do all this for you.You can find it here if you want softdownload22.For me was very helpful.Iam glad someone thought of this software and the good part is thet you dont have to pay anything this software is free.
lscski
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Sep 13, 2004

Posts: 403

Location:
Morrisville vt



Posted: Nov 04, 2008 - 1:31 PM GMT
Edited: Nov 04, 2008 - 1:33 PM GMT

Quote:
While on the topic, Do you know that DIN (Deutsche Industrie Norm) is like saying Metric? In todays lawyer chasing would, A good shop will NEVER or try NEVER to say DIN.....

While chatting with the Winterstiger rep, He told me that if the shop were ever brought to court and the shop owner/employee ever said DIN, The lawyer would laugh and say "Since when were we in Germany?"



lawyers are slick sob's. if you had a big money case, they would deffinitly play the name game. i've heard of a case where the cop called the school bus "yellow" in stead of "school bus yellow" and the case getiting droped. true story, my mommy told me so

__________
Praise be to Ullr
millerm277
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
May 28, 2006

Posts: 1181

Location:
Somerset County, NJ


Posted: Nov 04, 2008 - 2:05 PM GMT
Edited: Nov 04, 2008 - 10:16 PM GMT

Mine are set around 9. Never have released when I didn't want them to, always have released when I needed them to. (6' 1", 150lbs).

EDIT: Just realized this thread is 2 years old.
tedede
Profile | Galleries

Rank:

Member Since:
Nov 15, 2004

Posts: 910

Location:
Amherst, NH


Posted: Nov 04, 2008 - 8:05 PM GMT

Quote:
BTW - your din setting depends a lot on boot size. The bigger the boot the small the DIN. Seems backwards but that is the way it works. Go figure.


Think of your foot as a torque wrench for your leg. The longer the wrench, the easier it is to apply torque, so you'd need a lower DIN setting to maintain the same number of foot-pounds before releasing.

While there is a DIN chart on the net, it's not the "official chart" from the manufacturer, although it will likely be quite similar. You could likely do it yourself just fine. The major difference between you taking the screwdriver to the binding and the shop taking it, is who your insurance company will sue if you really hurt yourself skiing.

I however, would take it back to the shop, and admit your mistake. IMO, a good shop would reset it without charge.

Page: 1 

Tuesday July 29, 2014
Home : Privacy Policy : Terms of Use

Header image: Crotched Mountain (NH)

All logos and trademarks on this site are property of their respective owner.
© Copyright 2001-2006 by SnowJournal.com -- All Rights Reserved.

Network Services by Intercarve Networks
Powered by SnowFlake Content Management System - Version 1.0-beta5.2 (private)