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Ski Trips and Gas Prices

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Jimme
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Posted: Jun 03, 2004 - 4:49 PM GMT

With the cost of gas currently being over $2.10 per gallon, this will affect my choice of destinations this season if it remains high as I ski solo most of the time.

Jiminy Peak is closest to home and will run me about $4.50 round trip. Magic will be about $14. and Kmart a whopping $21. at best.

Will the gas prices affect ski plans for anyone else if prices remain so high?

Jimme


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rjc1976
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Posted: Jun 03, 2004 - 5:14 PM GMT

Even if gas prices are still the same in the winter (which I don't think they will be), it's not going to make a big difference as to where I choose to ski. Yes I could save a lot of gas money by skiing Mountain Creek, but it's just not worth it for me to ski locally to save a few bucks on gas. If necessary, I'd rather ski less and take the trips to the places that are further away vs. skiing on a more regular basis locally.
iskiatomic
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Posted: Jun 03, 2004 - 5:15 PM GMT

START SAVING THOSE NICKLES, IT ALWAYS AMAZED ME THAT GENERALLY THE PRICE OF GAS HAS BEEN HIGHEST IN THE WINTER. NOT SO THIS SPRING/SUMMER. I GENERALLY PUT ON 10,000 TO 12,000 MILES FROM MID OCTOBER TO MID MAY. PRETTY MUCH SKIING EVERY WEEKEND. WILL NEXT YEAR BE DIFFERENT? I HOPE NOT!!! JUST SOME QUICK MATH, WITH TODAYS PRICES THE SAME MILEAGE WOULD BE ANOTHER $500.00....OUCH!!

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moe
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Posted: Jun 03, 2004 - 6:01 PM GMT

I generally drive about 430 miles to and from work every week, so I'm unfortunately used to getting screwed by the cost of oil (luckily I get 30 miles per gallon). So with that in mind, it really won't effect my skiing plans at all. I just have to shell out more when the time comes.

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skijay
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Posted: Jun 03, 2004 - 7:35 PM GMT

I was kind of prepared for the high prices back at the end of 02 when I bought my vehicle. Fuel economy was at the top of the list. I get reasonable gas mileage with the SUV jr. or cute-ute or whatever you want to call the smaller car based SUV's. Mid to upper 20's highway is what I get, which is equivelent to your typical midsize sedan.

At this time I do not think I will be changing my driving habits for winter. For me it amounts to about less than $3.50 more to tank my vehicle now based on $1.79 (winter) versus $2.10 current prices. I only use about 11 gallons a week for commuting / recreation which is about 300 miles.





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Jiminy Peak - 11/18/2012 Jay Peak - 12/15/2012, 3/3/13, 4/27 Mount Snow - 12/17/2012, 1/5/2013, 1/26, 2/13, 3/10, 3/24, 3/30, 4/6, 4/13 Otis Ridge - 12/29/2012, 1/1/2013, 1/12, 1/27, 2/9, 2/16, 2/24, 3/16
Chris
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Posted: Jun 03, 2004 - 7:56 PM GMT

Quote:
Even if gas prices are still the same in the winter (which I don't think they will be), it's not going to make a big difference as to where I choose to ski. Yes I could save a lot of gas money by skiing Mountain Creek, but it's just not worth it for me to ski locally to save a few bucks on gas. If necessary, I'd rather ski less and take the trips to the places that are further away vs. skiing on a more regular basis locally.


rjc1976 ... that's an interesting view on the situation! What makes more desirous of the longer ski trips versus skiing locally? Lack of quality in your local skiing? What if you lived near one of the big ski areas ... would that change your view, or would you still travel to distant areas?

--csb


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skipatrol40s
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Posted: Jun 03, 2004 - 9:00 PM GMT
Edited: Jun 03, 2004 - 9:27 PM GMT

Interesting subject. Looking at mapquest and assuming 30MPG at $2.15/gal, for me to go roundtrip to Jay Peak would cost me $41 in gas. Round trip to Whiteface would be $26. If I had a 15 MPG vehicle it would be about $82 and $52 respectively. Ouch!

So how would this change my ski trips:

1. Reduce travel time jumping from resort to resort. Spend more time at the resort I am already at, which requires more money spent on lodging.

2. Car pool with friends more for day trips.

3. Be more selective on resort.

4. More overnight trips and car pooling means more planning and less spontaneous trips

5.Western/Canadian ski resorts start to look even better when compared to lots of day trips here in the east.

6. Places a little closer to home look even better when compared to places far away like Jay Peak and Sunday River.

riverc0il
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Posted: Jun 03, 2004 - 9:12 PM GMT

no difference for me based on three reasons:

1) 35MPG means i'm not paying that much more. considering the prices of lift tickets, $15 compared to $10 isn't that much more.

2) most mountains where i prefer skiing are almost all the same distance, so i won't be skiing closer to home.

3) if you're skiing less based on finances, it's time to re-evaluate what you're spending the rest of your money on and prioritize! what's more important than turns?

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strato
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Posted: Jun 03, 2004 - 10:20 PM GMT

I only wish that I could ski so much that the gas prices would make a significant impact. I spend 550 miles per week commuting to work (I average 30 mpg) so I have long passed the state of sticker shock for gas. I'll continue to find good deals on lift tickets and not let gas prices affect my decisions. As rocket21 said in a previous forum, gas prices are still cheap compared to even the early 1970's after adjustment for inflation.
ThatNYguy
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Posted: Jun 03, 2004 - 10:50 PM GMT

This topic reminds me of a few ski seasons in the mid 70's when the price of gas, although low was hard to get as rationing was the name of the game. Many ski areas started closing as the amount of skiers on the slopes diminished. Then came the conversion to electric motors became the new thing.
Seems to me that history could repeat itself in a different kind of way possibly changing skier habits as skiing closer to home may become the thing.
The die hards will always go where they want no matter what the case but the masses will determine the industry as a whole.

Russ

Chris
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Posted: Jun 03, 2004 - 11:23 PM GMT

When you think of the subject in it's singular isolation, it's easy to say "It's only an extra $x dollars." However, I think you need to zoom out to the bigger picture... because it's not just gas and tickets that are a few dollars extra. Fuel cost increases hit just about everything ... soon, your food will cost "just a bit extra", and sending a package will cost "just a bit extra", and a movie ticket will cost "just a bit extra". See where this is going?

All of a sudden, these extra dollar amounts coming from all aspects of your life will begin to add up! Before you know it, that little extra bit on a ski ticket and gas are going to seem a lot bigger.

--csb


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sbumwannabe
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Posted: Jun 03, 2004 - 11:56 PM GMT
Edited: Jun 03, 2004 - 11:59 PM GMT

My guess is gas prices will drop but not by much, countries like China and India have growing economies. China has become a country of gas guzzler like ourselves. Seems like oil demand has been building up for the last 2 years. So, I'm not skeptical when people says it is about supply and demand. The interesting question is how our economy is going to adapt to this change.

Back to the topic...
I get about 37 to 39 mph. Gas prices won't effect how far I will go, it's family and work commitments that determine how long of a drive I will take.
skipatrol40s
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Posted: Jun 04, 2004 - 12:04 AM GMT

Chris raises a good point.

Anyone know what the percentage of snowmaking fuel costs are compared to the total cost of running a ski area? Is fuel costs for snowmaking more than 5%, 10%, 25%, ..... of the total ski area costs? Will ski areas that did not use SNOWMAX before be taking another look at using SNOWMAX to reduce snowmaking energy costs?
skibachelor
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Posted: Jun 04, 2004 - 12:46 AM GMT

You guys think you got it bad, here in my town of Eugene, Oregon it's $2.31 and was $2.38 per gallon. However, it's funny how so many people complain about high gas prices while they spend a lot more on bottled water.
ski-n-sail
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Posted: Jun 04, 2004 - 1:53 AM GMT

Gas prices have been on my mind ever since my last trip to Killington at Easter. It cost me between $60+ round trip from Atlantic City NJ area to K and back in my Jeep Wrangler. Even a day trip to the Poconos this year was costing me about the price of a lift ticket. I can't seem to do a solo day trip for much less $75.

Ever since my trip to K, I have been thinking I should get a fair weather ski vehicle for those trips. I have been thinking of picking up either a diesel VW Golf or Jetta that gets 40-50mpg. I will wait till the fall to see where gas prices are going.

In the end, I will be damned if I am going to let the gas keep me from skiing. I may just need to get someone to share the ride.

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rocket21
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Posted: Jun 04, 2004 - 1:54 AM GMT

It's not so bad. Again, early 1980s we were talking $3 per gallon when you factor in inflation. Some parts of GB are paying $5 per gallon. Canada is looking at $1 per liter (get some real units, you Canucks!)

I remember the same uproar when gas prices hit $1 per gallon. As long as prices don't spin out of control beyond this, the number won't be as big a factor in time. Gas just happens to be the most competitive advertised price you see outside of your house.

The big impact may not be on the gas cost, but the energy cost for snowmaking. Get ready.

Unless prices balloon beyond where they're at now, it won't make a big difference in the ski industry - when going on a trip, what is the first thing most people do? Fill their tank to full. So long as the full tank gets to the destination and back, it doesn't matter - thus most ski trips won't be impacted as a direct result of gas prices.

Some tourism figures are showing more driving this year than last year even with the high prices.

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pharmacist
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Posted: Jun 04, 2004 - 2:56 AM GMT

Another interesting slant on this: Is the price of gas going to affect the price of skiing &/or services at resorts? Keep in mind that hard & soft goods, as well as food, etc. all has to be trucked in. Will there be a big enough ripple to affect the price we pay to enjoy the sport??

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Talisman
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Posted: Jun 04, 2004 - 11:58 AM GMT

I'm unfortunately old enough to have see high gas prices before and won't be radically changing my ski habits because of higher prices. The availability of gas is good which makes the current situation different than the first oil shock in the early '70's. When the cost of a ski day is reviewed gas is one of many costs. Lift tickets, food, beverages and lodging all add into the equation.

I generally ski with a 30 to 40% discount on lift tickets. I usually ski with my girl friend and split fuel costs. I drive a vehicle with decent gas mileage, usually don't eat ski area food, and have a share in a ski house to defray lodging. If I need to save money I will cook more dinners in at the ski house.

I may not be taking as many long distance, short duration trips to places like Whiteface, Sutton or Jay.
snowbasin
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Posted: Jun 04, 2004 - 1:57 PM GMT

Like Talisman, I'm about to carbon date myself, but back in the 70's I remember ski areas doing special offers (show your dated gas receipt - get $5 off lift tix, out of state deals, etc...) just to get people to the mountains. I also read earlier this past week that crude oil futures had traded at like $42.46 per barrel, even as Saudi had announced that they were opening their own valve up to encourage the rest of OPEC to do the same.

Or, economics lesson in shortform, this isn't particularly good short to mid term news for the U.S. period. If Iraq doesn't settle down into some real gov. at the end of the month and that oil still doesn't pump predictably, living close to a ski area could become an even better thing. Despite whatever the cost of a drop of oil in Europe or Can. may be (which is very HIGHLY taxed by those Gov's.) we fix our own economy's land, sea, and air shipping and travel costs on the barrel/pump price to us, not them.

At this point, any business that relies on transport is getting concerned about where/how the fuel cost factor will have impact. U.S. airlines are under hefty presure over domestic fuel rates vs. fare pricing right now.

Shameless reference intended, gas cost may actually prove to be a good thing as some of us here are working to get this New England Virtual Ski club idea off the ground. When I hear folks refer to dollar cost to get to the lifts, or cost per gallon, it makes me think that the timing in coming up with alternative ways to save some money skiing is actually good!

...or else me and Talisman might be hitchhiking up VT Rt. 100 like we (or at least I...) did back in the 70's with skis in the other hand.



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kayaker
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Posted: Jun 04, 2004 - 3:07 PM GMT

Although gas prices are high, the recent increases are not as high on a percentage basis as in the mid 70s and early 80s. Furthermore, there are no real shortages. In the 70s prices went from about 40 cents per gallon to over a dollar and supply was limited. I remember waiting in line to get gas for my Jeep when I was in high school. I can't remember the price increases during gas crisis in the 1980s but I do remember that supply was limited again. I almost ran out of gas on the Florida Turnpike and they would only sell me enough to get off the turnpike. Recently gas has increased from roughly 1.50 to 2.00 per gallon, about a 33% increase, and there are no real shortages at the pump. I don't think that small a percentage increase, and the lack of shortages will affect skiing that much. The big difference between now and then is that you can get gas although it is expensive. In the 70s and 80s you just couldn't get it.

The only answer is conservation. Historians 100 years from now will wonder how we allowed ourselves to get in a position where our economy is dependent on a politically unstable part of the world that to a large degree douesn't like us. Our leaders are afraid to mention conservation of resources because they think it results in reduced standards of living, when it actually will improve our standard of living.



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