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Forums : General Discussion : The Pit
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what gear is everyone playing on

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Jonni
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Posted: Feb 04, 2004 - 6:53 PM GMT

I ski on Crossmax 10s and I know that they are wood cored. I have 170s with s912 ti bindings on em. Gotta love the extra flex with the bindings pinned to the sides instead of screwed through the top.

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Fall Line n. Imaginary line following the most direct path down a slope that skiers continuously traverse on a run, often stopping at other invisible slope features along the way like the Tumble Lane, the Stagger Path and the Topple Zone.
sbumwannabe
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Posted: Feb 05, 2004 - 12:49 AM GMT

You must being skiing on an older model. I'm skiing on the 03-04 crossmax10. Salomon's web site states that it's a hybrid; foam/wood core. I meant to update my post but laziness got the better of me.

If you want to check for yourself, go to the "crossmax" menu and then to the "other technologies" sub menu. Its seem that also changed the dimension of the ski; the waist and tail is narrow but the tip is almost the same. Never demo the older model so I won't comment on any further comparison.
Anonymous

Posted: Feb 05, 2004 - 1:16 AM GMT

Be careful how you define woodcore skis. Some skis have a true woodcore (solid wood), while others claiming to be a woodcore ski have just wood strips or runners inbedded into the foam. A true woodore ski has solid wood on the inside , no foam.

Those skis with foam may be nimble and quick the first day on the hill, but quickly become like overcooked pasta.
WoodCore
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Posted: Feb 05, 2004 - 1:23 AM GMT

Quote:
Be careful how you define woodcore skis. Some skis have a true woodcore (solid wood), while others claiming to be a woodcore ski have just wood strips or runners inbedded into the foam. A true woodore ski has solid wood on the inside , no foam.

Those skis with foam may be nimble and quick the first day on the hill, but quickly become like overcooked pasta.


Sorry that was I


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sbumwannabe
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Posted: Feb 06, 2004 - 12:35 AM GMT

Woodcore, thanks for the info and warning.

I demoed some skis early this season. I really had fun on the crossmax10, mostly for the reasons you stated; it was light and nimble. Also, I got nice high speed stability going into the turns and through out the turn. Coming out of the turns I was getting a great pop. Note, I'm on the light side; 140-145 lbs, at 170 cm height; I was probally getting the ski into a deeper reverse camber.

After the demo, I was searching through the web to find good deals;
discount on last years model, demos and so on, that's how I found out about the core material and changes in the dimension. But I found a great price on the 04 model (brand new, 42-44% reduced from msrp). Been skiing on them for three weeks, they haven't gone limp yet. Guess I'm putting my faith (and $) on the new technologies and new construction techniques. In any new technology, somebody has to be the guinea pig.




Anonymous

Posted: Feb 06, 2004 - 1:59 AM GMT

Sbumwannbe,

Don't let my comments deter you from a ski that makes you happy, but depending on the number of days you spend on the hill each year the "guts" of your ski come into play. If you only ski a few days a year, a foam core or wood/foam core ski will last you a few seasons. If you ski more than 30 days a year on the same pair of skis you will notice that those "foam core" enhanced skis become "dead" and do not provide the same "out of box" responsiveness as they used too. Granted you'll pay a little more for a ski with a true woodcore, but in the long run if you take care of it, it will provide a similiar feel and responsiveness from the first day on the hill till well past the 100th day.

Technology is a great thing but just remember history, wood has been used for ski construction for centuries, there has to be a reason why?


WoodCore
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Posted: Feb 06, 2004 - 2:04 AM GMT

Quote:
Sbumwannbe,

Don't let my comments deter you from a ski that makes you happy, but depending on the number of days you spend on the hill each year the "guts" of your ski come into play. If you only ski a few days a year, a foam core or wood/foam core ski will last you a few seasons. If you ski more than 30 days a year on the same pair of skis you will notice that those "foam core" enhanced skis become "dead" and do not provide the same "out of box" responsiveness as they used too. Granted you'll pay a little more for a ski with a true woodcore, but in the long run if you take care of it, it will provide a similiar feel and responsiveness from the first day on the hill till well past the 100th day.

Technology is a great thing but just remember history, wood has been used for ski construction for centuries, there has to be a reason why?



Opps!, just me again

"The Pit, Too login or to not login in", I just forget

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SNOWTURX
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Posted: Feb 09, 2004 - 9:17 PM GMT

Quote:
but just remember history, wood has been used for ski construction for centuries, there has to be a reason why?


I'm sure you're right about wood vs foam cores.
But I feel fairly confident that if Plastics,from Petroleum,were around in the past they would have been utilised.
After all,what,apart from wood,could have been used ? Metal,Cats Guts,Bone ? Actually I think bone has been used,and metal still is,but not for the core.
I guess that "planks" in the old days were just that,bits of wood without any 'fancy' laminations.TURX.

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sbumwannabe
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Posted: Feb 11, 2004 - 1:07 AM GMT

Quote:

If you ski more than 30 days a year on the same pair of skis you will notice that those "foam core" enhanced skis become "dead" and do not provide the same "out of box" responsiveness as they used too.


IMO, its not the number of days you go skiing, its what you do on the hill. Whether you ski groomed terrain, mogul fields, recreational race and so on. Another factor is the physique; heavy frame or a light frame. Heavy set skiers can put a lot more force/pressure on the skis than a lighter frame skier and turn it limp a lot faster irregardless of core material. I've skied with a friend who is two inches taller and weighs 50 pounds more; he has to go on a longer and stiffer ski to get some pop else it would feel to soft for him. Technique is another factor; whether you use finesse or power to go down the slopes. Heard second hand about a mogul skier who would overpower his tails in the valleys to control his speed, he would go through a set of skis every season. Conversely, I've seen finesse type skiers using subtle and precise moves going down the steep trails of cannon and ragged. I think all these factors come into play on wearing down the core and are mainly the reason why the debate between foam or wood core has been going on and will continue to go on.

Had a two yr rossi (foam core) which took a lot of minor base and edge damage, it still had pop. I was going to use it as rock skis this year but sold it to a friend instead. Since I had no bad luck with core durability, the material was not an issue. I am more concern about edge and base damage since I also ski early and late season terrain.

BTW, I have a second set of ski that has a wood core (K2), right now I'm not bias one way or another.


Anonymous

Posted: Feb 17, 2004 - 4:05 PM GMT

I'm looking for new boots, any tips on selection?
rootjk
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Posted: Feb 19, 2004 - 3:42 PM GMT

Tecnica Icon Alu. Hot foam, forms rt to your foot w. foam and is really nice and stiff.
As for foam or wood skis, i ski all and i like all
btholl
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Posted: Mar 11, 2004 - 6:44 PM GMT

Hey, no one mentioned my favorite ski:

K2 Escape 5500.

I'm 5'2" about 145lb. Its a pretty heavy ski, but not too stiff. I would recommend it for a more agressive female. It has a similar shape to K2's blue T-9 ski, but it has a metal strip in the core (well, until this year... if you want it to hold better for carving get a pair at least a year old). It has a 17m turn radius which is just enough to have fun with, but you can still cruise on it. Its not a real soft ski so bumps are a little more difficult, but if you go down a few centimeters in size they are fine. I ski a 160, sometimes it feels like a little too much ski, but of all the skis I tried last year I liked this one the most. (I worked at Sun Valley and had free demos all season).

This year however, I tried the Volant Vertex... what a fun ski, a little smaller turn radius but lighter and shorter... great all mountain ski for women especially if you like bumps. It also come with different underfoot measurements from 66 to 71. For the guys I heard the Volant Gravity is fun, similar to the Vertex but a little more aggressive.

And of course, my favorite boot is Nordica... does anyone know a rep in Washington? I'm hoping to get a pair of W10's sometime.

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kayaker
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Posted: Mar 11, 2004 - 10:25 PM GMT

I demoed a pair of Fischer RX8s at Gunstock a few weeks ago and really liked them. I'm ready to give up my 190 cm Rossi Race Carvers. Any opinions on the Fischers?

salida
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Posted: Mar 12, 2004 - 12:19 AM GMT

No opinion on the fischers,

but,

I must say I absolutley love my Elan M 12 fusions. They rock my socks!!!!


porter

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btholl
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Posted: Mar 12, 2004 - 5:28 PM GMT

I've heard a TON of good things about Fischer. One of my good friends is big into Powder8 skiing and he has a pair of RX8s. He said they are great for practicing in all kinds of condition. I demo'd a pair last season at the end of the season before they brought them out and had a blast on them. My friend also said the RX9's are great if you want a little bit more of a racing ski. He usually competes on the Fischer Big Stix... I'd say any Fischer I've skied on has been great. Good hold on the hard stuff and losts of fun in the powder.

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btholl
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Posted: Mar 12, 2004 - 5:33 PM GMT

About boots...

I'd say go and try on different kinds because pretty much every boot manufacturer makes a boot for every level of skier. If you like stiff or forgiving you can find it in whatever brand fits your foot best. I spent about three hours at REI in December and just tried all the different brands. Nordica seemed to fit me the best... but my sister is definately at Technica girl. I think Technica and Lange are a bit more narrow all around (Lange especially in the toe box), Solomon had a bigger toe box but still tight in the calf, Nordica was a little wider all around. I've heard the Nordica Beast is a fun boot though.

My advice, go to a shop that carries a lot of brands and try them on, wear them around for about 15-20 minutes and see if there is any cramping and now the flex is. Then decide. Also some edition of SKIING magazine had a special on boots (I think it was November 2003) and it had some great info.

hope that helps!

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sledhaulingmedic
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Posted: Mar 13, 2004 - 4:39 AM GMT
Edited: Mar 13, 2004 - 4:56 AM GMT

AS for Fishers: I skied a pair of Big Stix at Ragged this week: 170cm for my petite 6'0" 220Lbs (that's 1.83M, 100kg for you, Skibatchelor ) and really enjoyed surfing the slush. It was like riding 2 snowboards.

Actually, they did ok on the hardpack in the morning, but not really a midwinter Eastern ski ( but they would ROCK YOUR WORLD on a powder day, East, West, Europe, Asia, North, South America, Africa, Oceana, Antarctica, and anywhere else that's blesses with soft snow!

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sbumwannabe
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Posted: Mar 13, 2004 - 12:55 PM GMT

My wife has the volant vertex 68. We ski in NE, she enjoys intermediate moguls, glades and groomed steeps. Seems like she can skid or carve at will depending on the terrain. She was amazed that it maintains a great hold on hardpack and frozen granular. Noticed that it doesn't have a big pop/rebound out of turns as other skis but this was not a big concern for her. She thinks they are great because of the stability and control it gives hers.
c300
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Posted: Mar 13, 2004 - 2:28 PM GMT

Head c 300 177 great on hard pack awe-sum x-pros k2 188cm for powder and crud very stable skis.
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Posted: Mar 13, 2004 - 3:36 PM GMT

Just got back from Tahoe, skiied on my volki 2002 p40's 183, with m71 logic bindings, no problem skiing everything there, a great all mountain ski. I tried the volki 5 star 168 mm while there but they just did not feel the same, to squirrely on the groom runs, just good in the bumps. Also skiied on k2 elcamino's for 4 years wore them out, rock skis now. Looking to buy new volki or k2 next season or maybe at end of this season. Must try before I buy! Demo's the way to go. later.

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