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PistenBully diesel-electric

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tom white
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Posted: Feb 07, 2012 - 1:43 PM GMT

Near the end of the article there is reference to the elimination of (most) hydraulics. In a cold environment that's a benefit. I also understand that diesel train engines are really diesel-electric. I presume the electric motor acts as a transmission. However can the engineers explain the basic advantages to diesel-electric engines. Why don't diesel cars and trucks have this?


ropeways.net | Home | 2012-02-07

Kässbohrer: First diesel-electric vehicle worldwide grooming the Alpine slopes!
PistenBully 600 E+ is now working in Kaunertal

Customers from Austria, Italy, Switzerland and Germany, plus the trade press, not only appraised the PistenBully 600 E+ on the slopes of the Kaunertal glacier, but also had a go at driving it. Kässbohrer Geländefahrzeug AG, pioneer and innovation leader in snow groomers, has been using the first diesel-electric PistenBully for several weeks.

From the study to series production:
The PistenBully 600 E+ was seen for the first time as the prototype PistenBully EQ.1 with diesel-electric drive (hybrid drive) 2009 at the Interalpin in Innsbruck. The vehicle set the standard for the industry with regard to sustainable vehicle technology. PistenBully 600 TwinPower and PistenBully 600 E+ are two vehicles that represent the Laupheim company's exemplary commitment to sustainability. The PistenBully EQ.1. has been subjected to numerous tests since the beginning of the study and has proven that fuel savings of up to 20 % are possible. The vehicle is now available as the PistenBully 600 E+. It meets the demand for environmentally-friendly, resource-friendly and above all economical driving in this vehicle class.

Diesel-electric drive: Environmentally-friendly, economical and costeffective.
Strictly speaking, diesel-electric drives are electric drives, which carry their own power plant - a generator, which is driven by a powerful diesel engine. The electrical energy produced supplies electric motors in addition to the propulsion motors for the direct actuation of the tiller and winch. With this technology the PistenBully 600 E+ becomes a sort of power station, which also allows you to connect external devices. The advantages are obvious: in comparison to a hydrostatic drive, the same or even a higher level of efficiency is achieved with lower power. The lower fuel consumption by up to 20 % is a particular advantage. On the one hand, this reduces emissions; on the other, the operating costs are lower and the vehicle becomes more cost-effective. Moreover, the energy is regained on the downrides and is used to drive the snow tiller. This type of drive also has advantages from a purely functional perspective, because you don’t need a hydraulic drive for attachments, but can operate them electrically. This also does away with the need for hydraulic pumps and hoses and the associated risk of leakages. The hybrid drive also provides enough power to operate external electric tools, e.g. for repair work. The diesel-electric drive was developed in close cooperation with external partners and universities.



obienick
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Posted: Feb 07, 2012 - 2:20 PM GMT
Edited: Feb 07, 2012 - 2:26 PM GMT

The diesel-electric locomotive works by generating electricity through a generator attached to the massive diesel engine. There are eight "notches" or ppwer-output settings. This generator then provides electricity to 4 to 6 electric motors to power the wheels. The advantage is that the diesel engine can operate at the most efficient speed to generate the needed electricity. Also, you can use regenerative braking. The downside is that such a setup requires too much space for a car, and generally the smaller a engine, the more efficient it is.

From what I've watched on YouTube (correct me if I'm wrong) it seems in a groomer, the operator sets the rpm speed of the engine and leaves it. This provides a certain maximum power to wheels and tiller as demanded by the operator. I imagine this provides great control but poor efficiency. Beyond a certain point, if the operator wants more power, he or she will sacrifice efficiency.

I've always wondered why larger things haven't gone diesel-electric. Certainly with today's technology, high-tech dimmer switches shoukd be good enough to provide tge needed controll for left vs. right drive train vs. tiller.
Bill29
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Posted: Feb 07, 2012 - 4:26 PM GMT

Quote: "I've always wondered why larger things haven't gone diesel-electric."

Trains. For a long time.
tom white
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Posted: Feb 07, 2012 - 5:22 PM GMT

[quote]
From what I've watched on YouTube (correct me if I'm wrong) it seems in a groomer, the operator sets the rpm speed of the engine and leaves it. This provides a certain maximum power to wheels and tiller as demanded by the operator. I imagine this provides great control but poor efficiency. Beyond a certain point, if the operator wants more power, he or she will sacrifice efficiency.
quote]

Ok I get that part, keeping the rpm set at performance/efficiency then running stuff off the electric motors makes good sense.
nitro
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Posted: Feb 07, 2012 - 6:50 PM GMT

The diesel/electric motor set up has a major advantage in that the drive motor is a series wound electric motor which, like the steam engine, can produce its maximum torque @ 0 rpm. That's just what you what to get a train moving or a fully loaded super quad. The diesel engine is run at it's most efficient speed and there is no need for a clutch or hydraulic coupling to connect the electric motor to the wheels.

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