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Rosemount Ski Boots?

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elcamino57
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Posted: Jan 27, 2009 - 2:16 AM GMT

Anyone here ever use Rosemount Ski Boots? I think they were the first epoxy fiberglass boot. I met someone that used them years ago and was wondering if anyone still has some laying around to sell.
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Posted: Jan 27, 2009 - 2:30 AM GMT

Quote:
History 101 Rosemount Inc.

Address:
12001 Technology Drive
Eden Prairie, Minnesota 55344
U.S.A.

Telephone: (612) 941-5560
Fax: (612) 828-7777


Statistics:
Wholly Owned Division of Emerson Electric Co.
Incorporated: 1956
Employees:
Sales: $600 million (1995 est.)
SICs: 3823 Process Control Instruments; 5049 Professional Equipment & Supplies


Company History:

Rosemount Inc., which began as a space-age engineering company, designs and produces measurement instrumentation for industrial applications. The complex sensors and transmitters the company manufacturers are critical components of sophisticated energy, process, and manufacturing facilities. Purchased by Emerson Electric Co. in 1976, Rosemount proved to be a top performer for the century-old company. Rosemount was integrated with another Emerson acquisition, Fisher Controls International, in 1992. The combined operations of Fisher and Rosemount represent the largest supplier of process control equipment in the world.

Rosemount's history is linked to the development of supersonic jet aircraft and the United States-Soviet Union space race. Dr. Frank D. Werner, a scientist and inventor, was involved in temperature and pressure sensor research at The Rosemount Research Center at the University of Minnesota when the U.S. Air Force asked him to manufacture the total temperature sensors he had developed for their high-performance aircraft. Werner asked Robert E. Keppel, an engineer at the aeronautical lab, and Vernon H. Heath, the business manager, to join him in the part-time project. With $8,000 in seed money the men incorporated Rosemount Engineering Company in 1956. They produced their first product in a building that had once been a chicken hatchery.

The total temperature sensors they produced could measure the air compression-caused heat which was generated during high speed flights. The technological breakthrough allowed test pilots to get precise readings on the speed of their prototype jets for the first time. The start-up company sold $30,000 worth of the sensors in their first year. The next year they had a full-time operation with 20 employees and sales of $196,000. In 1957 the Soviet Union launched the first artificial satellite, Sputnik I. The United States responded by accelerating the pace of their own space program, and Rosemount's sensors were soon in demand for deep space exploration applications.

Rosemount Engineering was a custom business in those early days. The government supplied the company with sensor specifications, and Rosemount would fabricate them. Nearly all its sensors were used in aircraft and missiles. Its products were technologically advanced and produced at low volumes and high labor costs; in 1960, 24 of the company's 144 employees were engineers. Sales reached $1.5 million in 1960, but the owners still needed a $300,00 bank loan to keep going. Expansion costs associated with new products, such as low-pressure sensors, were outpacing sales.

But revenues continued to rise steadily and reached $5.6 million by 1963 with earnings of $240,000. "By then we were also getting a little smug about our success," said Vernon Heath in a March 1984 Star Tribune article. "We were innovative, we were growing, and we thought we could make anything happen if it involved technology." The company made a stab at a consumer product line. It developed the first engineered, molded-plastic ski boot--which eventually found its way to a place in the Smithsonian Institution--but plagued the company with manufacturing problems and high costs.

High performance aircraft and the space program continued to be the forces propelling the company forward in the 1960s. McDonnell's Gemini, North American's Saturn and Apollo, Martin's Titan Series, General Dynamics F111, Lockheed's C-141, Douglas' DC9, Boeings's 707, 720, and 727, and the European Supersonic Concorde all depended on Rosemount sensors. Rosemount celebrated the end of its first decade with sales of $8.5 million and a 19 percent increase in profits. By 1965 they had developed a British subsidiary, Rosemount Engineering Company Limited, which served the aircraft manufacturing market in England. Applications for temperature and pressure sensors were being expanded and associated equipment, such as airplane stall warning and ice detection systems, were added to the product line. But only seven percent of Rosemount sales were coming from the industrial market.

When Vernon Heath succeeded Werner as president of Rosemount Engineering Company in mid-1968, he faced changes in the industries it depended on for the vast majority of its sales. Heath attributed a 7.15 percent decrease in sales in 1969 to a shift in the defense industry. Net income had risen but only due to the sale of a manufacturing plant and the ski boot division. The ski boot line, which was sold to G. H. Bass & Co., had cost the company more than $2 million in losses. Undaunted, Rosemount rolled another high-tech project out and into a wholly owned subsidiary named Unifol Systems Co.

Unifol was a computer controlled, air pressure levitated and propelled personal rapid transit (PRT) system. A Honeywell researcher, who had worked on and then purchased the rights for the project, interested Frank Werner in pursuing its development. Rosemount had hoped to fund the project with public financing or equity participation by another firm, but even with renewed federal interest in public transportation Rosemount had trouble funding Uniflo. A joint effort with Northrup Corp. to win a Department of Transportation (DOT) contract for a demonstration mass transit system at Dulles International Airport failed. The DOT passed over the Uniflo project for more conventional mass transit systems. Uniflo later received two other federal research grants but made no sales. The project, which was abandoned in 1973, cost Rosemount about $1 million.

Rosemount did have one successful spin-off from its main concern in those early days. The company's rapid growth had left it with a space crunch, but the owners could not afford to buy themselves office cubicles. So Frank Werner assembled panels from lumberyard hollow-core doors and molded casings. The office partitions worked so well the company decided to begin selling them. In 1966 Rosemount created a subsidiary, Rosemount Partitions Inc., to manufacture the movable office partitions called "Rotopanels." They later expanded into desks, storage areas, and other office furniture.

But Rosemount's other efforts to reduce its dependency on the U.S. space and defense programs proved to be the most profitable. In the late 1960s it had devised a plan to move temperature and pressure measurement instruments into areas of the industrial market which had a need for high accuracy measurement. It got off to a good start increasing industrial sales by 33 percent from 1969 to 1970. Heath said in a December 1972 Corporate Report Minnesota article, "We feel the financial results for fiscal 1972 are good indicators of the progress we are making in our carefully planned program of applying proven Rosemount technology to new markets."

The basic research which Rosemount used to develop space and defense technology was applied to products for commercial aviation, synthetic fiber, petrochemical, and nuclear and conventional power production needs. The company opened five new sales offices in Europe and three in the United States. New marketing efforts commenced in South America and Canada. Rosemount Engineering Company changed its name to Rosemount Inc. The company wanted to declare that it had expanded beyond its instrument engineering roots to become a producer and seller of engineering instruments on multi-industry and multi-national level. To cap things off, 1972 was the company's first million-dollar profit year.

During the ten years from 1963 to 1973, Rosemount's sales rose at a compound annual rate of 16 percent with earnings rising at a rate of 19 percent. It also expanded its facilities four times during that time period. By the end of its second decade, in 1975, sales were more evenly distributed between the defense, space, and commercial aviation market and the energy, process, and manufacturing market. In spite of an economic recession, Rosemount sales for fiscal year 1975 increased 26 percent to $41 million, and earnings per share were $3.30, up from $1.66 the previous year. International and export sales grew 42 percent and comprised over 25 percent of total sales. The company had more than 1,300 employees in the United States, Switzerland, West Germany, England, France, Denmark, Canada, and Japan.

Rosemount's earnings nearly doubled from 1974 to 1975, and its success cost the company its independence. In a March 1984 Star Tribune article Dick Youngblood wrote, "The response on Wall Street--down on small companies in general and wary of Rosemount's tendency to veer into off-the-wall business--was to value the company's stock at a peak of eight times earnings per share." Takeover threats by billion-dollar corporations moved Heath to accept a friendly merger. Emerson Electric Co., a St. Louis-based $4 billion conglomerate with a reputation for giving autonomy to the companies it acquired, bought Rosemount Inc. in 1976 for $54 per share, double its trading level. Stockholders received $54 million in Emerson stock. Heath was named head of the consolidated aerospace and industrial control operations.

Rosemount, which was once referred to by Youngblood as "a small company with an impressive talent for making space-age sensing instruments--and an absolute genius for diluting that effort with unrelated, unprofitable ventures," had a new image by the early 1980s. Rosemount was no longer small nor diverted by technological challenges like PRT systems and ski boots. Aerospace know-how had been balanced by industrial acumen. Rosemount's 1983 revenues, which had been consolidated with Emerson's, were estimated to exceed $250 million. Operating profits were about $50 million, and return on assets was between 18 and 20 percent. By 1985 government contracts had been reduced to 20 percent of sales.

Although Rosemount clearly had moved the majority of its business into the industrial segment its products still had an important presence in the U.S. space effort. The first "reusable-returnable" space craft, the space shuttle, relied on Rosemount instruments. A pair of Rosemount sensors assisted pilots with determining the shuttles's angle of re-entry into the earth's atmosphere. Other sensors in the shuttle's rocket motor had a matter of seconds to response to temperatures changes of 2000 degrees Fahrenheit that occurred during the crucial launch phase. For Rosemount Inc. testing devises such as wind tunnels and environmental chambers were just tools of the trade.

While Rosemount strived to apply the rigorous standards of the highly technical aerospace industry to the industrial market, Heath seemed equally committed to creating a atmosphere that fostered a committed and involved work force. Heath said in a 1985 Corporate Report Minnesota article, "For us, success is a matter of identifying common goals and establishing a culture that feeds itself and builds upon its." People as well as profit were important to him, and that philosophy elevated Rosemount to a position among the world's largest manufacturers of precision measurement and control instruments.

Rosemount revenues doubled over the five year period from 1983 to 1988 and reached the $500 million mark. Likewise, the employment figure nearly doubled in that time period to about 4,500 workers. Then in 1987 four Emerson instrument divisions were consolidated as the Rosemount Measurement and Control Instrumentation Group. The new group, which was managed by Heath, had 9,000 employees world wide and an estimated $1 billion in sales. Rosemount not only grew larger but continued improving its products. The company earned a place on the Fortune magazine "100 Products That America Makes Best" list in 1988--and again in 1991--for its "pressure transmitters for industrial power plants."

Rosemount, like many other international businesses, had its share of problems in the 1980s. United States trade sanctions short circuited a sales agreement with a French company for pressure transmitters. The Reagan administration had banned sales destined for a Soviet natural gas pipeline to Europe. Rosemount was concerned not only with the broken contract but with losing in market share and good will it had built up in Europe. Rosemount was also struggling in the Far Eastern markets. Rosemount-designed pressure transmitters were already being used in nuclear power plants in China, but Chinese government regulations and shortage of capital were inhibiting sales in that huge market. And in Japan a joint venture begun in 1975 was stalled by the company's inability to crack through the Japanese distribution system. Despite roadblocks the consolidated Rosemount group entered the 1990s accounting for about one-sixth of Emerson's total sales volume.

In 1991 Heath left his position as CEO but remained on as chairman. Rosemount revenues were about $1.1 billion at the time. Instrumentation-related acquisitions which were rolled into the company and the steady development and improvement of products facilitated Rosemount's rapid growth. Rosemount consistently was its parent company's greatest generator of stockholder value. In a move to further enhance its position in the process control market, Emerson purchased Fisher Controls International in 1992 for $1.25 billion. According to Emerson, the combined Fisher and Rosemount businesses created, "with one move, a marketing and technology leadership position in a $15 billion global industry." Fisher's strength was in control valve products and Rosemount's in measurement instrumentation. Emerson expected the new division to make half its sales outside the United States.

In 1993 Rosemount Inc. came under the scrutiny of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A utility company engineer implicated Rosemount in a 1988 coverup of faulty transmitters in a Connecticut nuclear power plant. According to the engineer, Rosemount corrected the transmitter failure warning problem but pressured the utility to keep the problem quiet. Nuclear industry vendors are required to report problems with products. At the time, both Rosemount and Emerson officials declined to comment on the investigation, and the company was seeking to have the suit dismissed. Rosemount held more than 40 percent of the worldwide market for pressure transmitters. That same year a Rosemount facility was named one of "America's 10 Best Plants" by Industry Week. The pressure transmitters produced in the plant, which was opened in 1990, were used to measure pressure in everything from oil pipelines and power plants to beer vats. Honeywell Incorporated, one of Rosemount's largest competitors, also had a plant on the list.

Rosemount's long-time relationship with the aerospace industry ended in 1993. Emerson sold the Rosemount Aerospace unit to B. F. Goodrich Company for $300 million in cash. The division, which manufactured aircraft temperature and pressure sensors, had sales of $130 million in fiscal year 1993, with 60 percent of that revenue from commercial and 40 percent from military aircraft. More employee layoffs, in addition to those related to the integration with Fisher, followed the elimination of the aerospace division. Another of Rosemount's earliest divisions was sold in 1995. Vernon Heath, who had retired from his chairmanship position with Rosemount in 1994, bought Office Systems Inc. The office furniture business's 1994 revenues were $20 million; the company had been profitable for nearly its entire existence.

Rosemount Inc.'s history was one of transformations. From its aerospace roots, through misguided attempts at diversification, and finally success in the industrial marketplace Rosemount seemed like a classic American success story. In spite of ups and downs the company gravitated back to what it did best. Emerson had brought in money for research and capital equipment and improved asset management, but the company had remained much the same. But in the 1990s Emerson was moving towards consolidating its operations, and Rosemount Inc. went under another transformation. The company faced the 21st century identified as part of a process control system division, rather than as an independent manufacturer. Whether this would have an impact on its future remained to be seen.


mmqb
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Posted: Jan 27, 2009 - 2:34 AM GMT

A Revolutionary New Ski Boot Has A Streamlined Shell Of Rigid Fiber Glass
photogf128
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Posted: Jan 27, 2009 - 2:39 AM GMT

I knew Dr Warner apres his stellar engineering career in Jackson where he started a solar panel/energy systems company called Park Energy in the mid-70's. He also invented a putter that had this big hole in the bottom that picked up the golf ball so you didn't have to bend down to pick it up. I don't think it was a big seller.

He told me the rear entry boot had water leaking problems. Never tried them but they looked pretty cool.

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4aprice
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Posted: Jan 27, 2009 - 3:24 AM GMT

I had a pair of Rosemonts back in the late 70's They had red, white and blue stars on the outer layer. I got alot of ribbing from friends about them but I also remember them being an ok boot. The pair I had are long gone.

Alex

Lake Hopatcong, NJ
mmqb
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Posted: Jan 27, 2009 - 7:51 AM GMT
Edited: Jan 27, 2009 - 8:07 AM GMT

This topic got me THINKING about ski developments over the years, tell us about your early development memories of the sport of skiing:

Quote:
Salomon Reviews | Snowboarding Gear Reviews
In 1952 in Europe, George Salomon invented automated equipment to manufacture ski edges in mass quantities thus revolutionizing the industry. ...


Howard Head

Hart Ski Co.

Cubco Ski Bindings and now the rest of the story??????
photogf128
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Posted: Jan 27, 2009 - 11:53 AM GMT
Edited: Jan 27, 2009 - 11:56 AM GMT

Quote:
This topic got me THINKING about ski developments over the years, tell us about your early development memories of the sport of skiing:


My first year at Jackson(1980) got a job as a painter between the summer season and winter season. They needed extra help for a big job painting the inside of the upper level of the Village Center which is next to tram Building. A new binding company was taking over the space called Burt Bindings where your boots and bindings were connected by retractable cables. The idea was when the bindings were released your boots would be pulled by the cable back on the binding. They did produce them that winter but they didn't work very well so they went out of business and if I remember correctly the painting company never got paid.

A few years later when I was a staff photog for the Jackson paper I photographed Life Link co-founder John Sims who invented the Croakie. Everyone in Jackson used them before they became the popular piece of equipment used by many today.

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mmqb
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Posted: Jan 27, 2009 - 5:55 PM GMT

Burt Binding, good find. From SJ.com: Burt Bindings

How about a binding that started in S_ _ _ _ _ _ N
Bill29
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Posted: Jan 27, 2009 - 7:15 PM GMT

I had a pair of Rosemount boots. They were the stiffist and perhaps the most uncomfortabe boots I've ever owned. They had little packets of tiny plastic beads and you were supposed to stuff them into seven pockets inside the boot to custom fit it to your feet. I never could do that right. They seemed to change shape every time I put the boot on. Others didn't have that problem, I guess.
They certainly let you put pressure on the edge of your ski. There was no give to that shell at all. I had been wearing leather boots until I got a deal on the Rosemounts toward the end of the season. Actually, the first time I wore them was on a trip to Colorado, at Snowmass. I remember coming off a chair and edging hard, the way I did with the leather boots, in the turn at the bottom. The edge dug in deep, the ski stopped and I went flat on my face. I heard an accented voice say "Are you all right?" I said yes, looked up and it was Stein Ericksen, the new ski school director at Snowmass. A real great start on a Colorado ski trip.
The next year a group of us went to Italy and some guy was fascinated by the Rosemounts. He called them Scarpa de Luna - moon boots. (Please pardon my probably erroneous attempt at Italian.) He wanted to buy them. I should have sold them to him. I got rid of them at the end of the season. Other people I knew had little or no trouble with them, but they weren't popular enough to stick around for very many seasons.
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Posted: Jan 28, 2009 - 12:47 AM GMT

Thanks for all the input, interesting history of that boot.
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Posted: Jul 24, 2009 - 7:12 PM GMT

I have a pristine pair quietly tucked away in storage. My uncle was a hardcore skier back in the day in fact he was one of the many that helped build and erect lift towers in Snow Valley in California. He was a hell of a man. Anyways, I'm interested in what you might offer for them? I saw a pair on ebay for $260 but they're worth more to me that a few hundred dollars. These are keepers. I haven't read all of the responses to this post so I have no idea if you've located a pair, but here you go.
dogfart
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Posted: Jul 24, 2009 - 7:15 PM GMT
Edited: Jul 24, 2009 - 7:17 PM GMT

"I had a pair of Rosemount boots. They were the stiffist and perhaps the most uncomfortabe boots I've ever owned. They had little packets of tiny plastic beads and you were supposed to stuff them into seven pockets inside the boot to custom fit it to your feet. I never could do that right. They seemed to change shape every time I put the boot on. Others didn't have that problem, I guess.
They certainly let you put pressure on the edge of your ski. There was no give to that shell at all. I had been wearing leather boots until I got a deal on the Rosemounts toward the end of the season. Actually, the first time I wore them was on a trip to Colorado, at Snowmass. I remember coming off a chair and edging hard, the way I did with the leather boots, in the turn at the bottom. The edge dug in deep, the ski stopped and I went flat on my face. I heard an accented voice say "Are you all right?" I said yes, looked up and it was Stein Ericksen, the new ski school director at Snowmass. A real great start on a Colorado ski trip.
The next year a group of us went to Italy and some guy was fascinated by the Rosemounts. He called them Scarpa de Luna - moon boots. (Please pardon my probably erroneous attempt at Italian.) He wanted to buy them. I should have sold them to him. I got rid of them at the end of the season. Other people I knew had little or no trouble with them, but they weren't popular enough to stick around for very many seasons."


Great story!
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Posted: Jul 25, 2009 - 2:50 AM GMT

I'm lost.........
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Posted: Jul 26, 2009 - 3:34 PM GMT

I worked for a sporting goods shop that just might still have some in storage. If you don't care what size they are I could try to check if they still have some.
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Posted: Jul 27, 2009 - 11:59 AM GMT

The cover of my 1969 ski atlas has a young man and woman in "the latest", he's wearing Rosemount boots.

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Posted: Jul 27, 2009 - 12:13 PM GMT

My dad (who just turned 90) had a pair about 30 yrs ago. They are probably long gone. But I have one brother who is a big pack rat. It is possible he has them in his basement??
pic of my dad and his rosemounts
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Posted: Feb 15, 2010 - 4:25 AM GMT

The year was 1967. I had just gotten certified as a ski instructor and was a member of the National Ski Patrol. My cousin worked as an engineer for Rosemont engineering. He was able to get me a pair of Rosemont ski boots for for 1/2 price. ($130 in 1966 was a HUGE amount of money for a teenager.)

I paired these ski boots up with the first all fiberglass Tony Sailer Ski's. They were an awesome combination indeed. The comments about fine edge control are not exaggerated in the least. You could actually feel the grain of the snow/ice under your edges. Edge response was lightning fast. On ice, you could see sparks from the edges cutting into the ice!

Many folks with the traditional leather or the new plastic Lange boots, didn't like the Rosemonts because they felt that they were too 'touchy' and were way too unforgiving. Indeed they were if you couldn't adapt to the unbelievable edge control that you had. (I later bought a pair of Lange boots, but went back to my Rosemont's.)

The Rosemont boots had their problems. I went through three pairs. (Two sets were warrantied.) Your foot entered the boot through the side door, located on the inside edge side of the boot. Leaks could develop where the fiberglass door closed on the bottom. Another issue was the fiberglass doors took a huge beating from the ski edges raking over its surface. This was later addressed by adding a stainless steel plate which covered this tender area. The ankle area around the boot was covered by an elastic nylon covering held in place by two stainless steel cables, one cable that went around the top fiberglass cuff, with a buckle locking it closed, and one around the fiberglass boot, locking the entry door closed. With time, ski edges would cut the fabric creating holes that would leak. I had to replace a number of covers on my boots.

The cuff was attached to the boot with a pair of stainless steel hinges (an awesome piece of engineering by the way). These hinges could be offset allowing a tilt to the inside or outside as desired by the skier. This was a great boon for me as I am a bit bow legged. However, the connection points to the cuff and boot were known to break out (they had embedded stainless steel anchors the hinges were attached to). If these connection points broke lose, the boot was unrepairable. If the guarantee was over, you were out of luck and a set of ski boots.

The forward tilt and resistance was controlled by rubber band type elements that were where your Achilles tendon is located, connected to the cuff and the back of the boot. Different colored rubber band elements had different resistance values to forward motion and basically controlled how much you could lean forward. This was great, as you could fine tune your boots to your weight and height, to get the correct back pressure from the boot.

The padding...when you got it right, it was the most comfortable ski boot on the planet with zero slop. And I do mean zero slop. ZERO. Loose fitting boots = loose control. (Even a little.) The trick was getting it right. This was NOT easy. You had to buy the boots a bit lose. You HAD to use the SAME SOCKS when you fit them that you used when you skied in them. This was an absolute MUST. I bought 4 pair of wool socks that were identical. I also wore ladies nylon footies under the wool socks to prevent chafing. This was commonly worn by those that used the Rosemonts as they were be very unforgiving if your feet would swell a bit, causing deep imprints in your ankles from the wool socks. The boot of the Rosemont was a fiberglass shell that did not expand at all. So, your foot had to make up the difference.

Back to the padding...there were seven soft leather pads inside each boot. These were designed to hold your heel in place, and hold your foot stationary inside the cuff and boot.
Each pad had a space behind its padding for additional filler pillows to take up more space. The pads and pillows were filled in with top secret 'super stuff' that acted like a fluid solid. My cousin that worked at Rosemont told me what the 'super stuff' was...it was powdered Teflon that was formed into tiny microscopic beads that looked like talcum powder. This was magic stuff that was developed for the space program. When you applied pressure to it, it would flow and conform to the shape pressing on it. When you took the pressure away, it would stay in place (for a while)! However, if you didn't wear your boots for several weeks, gravity would cause the pads to flow towards gravity. This was where many people cursed the high tech padding. If you put the boots on loosely (ie. used thinner socks or went barefoot) for about 15 minutes or so, the padding would reform to where it belonged and you'd be back in business. If you didn't, they felt like the proverbial iron maiden clamping down on your feet for those agonizing 15 minutes it took for the pads to reform.

The other issue with the padding was Rosemont didn't give you nearly enough of the little pillows in enough sizes to fit your boots properly. (Luckily I was able to get a bunch of them from my cousin.) Later, they sold a 'fitting kit' for $35 with the needed pillows and rubber band tension elements. To do it right, you always had to use the biggest pillow you could. Two 10cc pillows didn't work nearly as well as one 20cc pillow because of the flow characteristics of the 'magic stuff' inside them. The powdered Teflon must have been expensive, as they were always rather stingy about giving them out.

Making the boots...Rosemont had a huge bounty out for anyone who could build a machine that could make the fiberglass shells automatically. No one did. This was one of the reasons they lost about a million $$ a year on them. Their yield on the manufacturing line was only about 50%. Sometimes, much less. Injection molding with equally hard and strong thermoplastics, matching the fiberglass they were using, just wasn't available at that time. So, the shells had to be hand made and finished. They lost almost the full cost of the ski boots on every pair they sold.

The Rosemonts were fiddly, expensive, odd looking, quirky, and problem riddled. They were also the finest high performance ski boots I ever owned (which were many). I was very proud to have them, and enjoyed every single moment I skied in them. It is very sad that they are no more. Many of the problems they had back then could be solved with the newer materials we have today. The magnificent edge control they gave has never been equaled (IMHO).

-Joe-




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Posted: Sep 22, 2011 - 6:44 PM GMT

I have a pair of Rosemount ski boots that I received as a gift in 1973. They have NEVER been used. They are size 12. If you have any interest, please contact me.
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Posted: Sep 23, 2011 - 5:21 PM GMT

My parents both had Rosemount boots back in the day. My dads were tossed when they wore out, but we had my moms made into lamps. They still have them around. For those not around in those days, they do make a great conversation piece.

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