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Monadnock

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weedywart
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Posted: Jan 28, 2007 - 2:54 PM GMT
Edited: Jan 28, 2007 - 2:55 PM GMT

On my way to Bromley the other day I passed this N.H. peak. It looks like an interesting skin-up and ski down mtn. How about it? What are the best trails for skiing and climbing? The advertise 12 miles of maintained but not groomed x-c trails around the base. Anyone know what they are like? Of course, we need snow. One other interesting thing to note would be that the state has a section on their park website regarding winter camping and how their state park would be a good place to hone your skills at it. Three cheers for a state that encourages that!!!!
ThatNYguy
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Posted: Jan 28, 2007 - 3:40 PM GMT

Kinda ironicly I was on Goggle Earth last night looking at this mountain. It has a beautiful exposure, decent vertical and location, location, location. Based on the geography to its south and southwest, this mountain should collect snow nicely.
Maybe Mapnut will start a challenge on this place

Russ
sledhaulingmedic
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Posted: Jan 28, 2007 - 3:59 PM GMT

Lost Farm and Parker trails would be suited to XC (with snow, of course.) There are quite a few other trails between Poole Road and the Harling trail which are likely what DRED is refering to.

Looking at the mountain from the North (Dublin) side along 101 certainly makes me want to ski the summit. The reality is that there are only a few short gullies that fill in. Unfortunately, there are no trails maintained as ski trails off the summit. Red Spot/Old Ski Path is probably the best shot at keeping your skis on for the majority of the decent.



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weedywart
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Posted: Jan 29, 2007 - 12:00 PM GMT

Thanks, I hope some others add there take here. Three years ago I remember seeing some guy's input on another website regarding his climbing it with skins.
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Posted: Jan 29, 2007 - 1:21 PM GMT

A couple of things:

One of the hiking trails on Monadnock is called "The Old Ski Trail", so I assume that skiing, probably cross country, was an activity on Monadnock. Any of you readers skied Monadnock?

Also, I few of you recently have made reference to climbing skins. While I know what they are, in my 40+ years of skiing, I have never seen them either in use or on a store shelf. Where do you get these?

Last, if one is skiing back-country, would carrying some of those new snow shoes in one's back pack (and using them when needed) be superior or not to pulling out skins?

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NewYorkSkier17
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Posted: Jan 29, 2007 - 1:29 PM GMT

Hey guys, This is a great peak, right near Keene valley. I hiked the peak in the summer about 3/4 of the mountain are perfect for skiing. there is actually a road that goes about half way up, perfect for a run, the rest of the mountain is very "rocky" Large boulders that would disrupt a good run. Especially within 500 ft of the summit. Also there is a once closed ski area outside of keene that reopened a few years back forget the name of it, but another interesting topic regarding the area. Have fun if you decide to ski the road.

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weedywart
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Posted: Jan 29, 2007 - 1:36 PM GMT
Edited: Jan 30, 2007 - 10:23 AM GMT

There's a small ski/boarding area called Granite Gorge http://www.granitegorge.com/ that opened recently. It isn't on this mtn., though. It has a vertical drop of 525' and a cross country area.
Skins can be optained in specialty ski shops or over the internet. My current pair I optained over E-bay. If the snow is deep, you can move faster over snow and climb better on a trail with skis and skins than with snowshoes. The full name of them would be climbing skins, and they appeal to people who want to climb and ski down a mountain. Once you remove them, your bases are smooth. Waxes work better for crossing country as they are lighterThe shoes work better if you go off trail, especially in Eastern forests with thickets, etc. If the snow has a heavy, icy crust, you are better off using the shoes with the specialty binding that allows you to break the crust with your toes. I've never tried climbing skins on crust that can support my weight, but skiing hard crust snow usually leads to a bad day.
the_hop
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Posted: Jan 29, 2007 - 8:10 PM GMT

OK, I have skied Monadnock. The summit is not a very good ski, though off to the North and a little west, it is skiable. Most of the popular hiking trails are NOT. There is an old road, that connects to the cross country trails and I believe the "old ski trail" mentioned, but it does not go to the summit as I recall. It has been probably 10 years since I skied on Monadnock.

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weedywart
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Posted: Jan 30, 2007 - 10:17 AM GMT
Edited: Jan 30, 2007 - 10:18 AM GMT

So, hop, you wouldn't go back for the descent.
MadRider
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Posted: Feb 18, 2007 - 2:41 PM GMT

Never skied there, although I'm aware that some, like hop, have, and my overall impression is that the woods lower down have good cross-country skiing, but the summit rarely gets enough snow.
"Monadnock" is a geological term for an isolated peak (Mt. Ascutney is another example.) This means that the peak is more exposed to wind. In the case of Monadnock, where the summit is bare due in part to fires set by farmers in the 1800s to drive out wolves, the wind just scours away the snow. Snowfall in the region is usually insufficient to cover the peak in any case.
So yes, it can be skied (nearly any hill with snow on it can), but is the quality of the descent worth the effort? I'll leave the answer to that one to those who have skied it.

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skipatrol40s
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Posted: Feb 18, 2007 - 4:42 PM GMT

Ask Larry Davis
weedywart
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Posted: Feb 21, 2007 - 1:22 PM GMT
Edited: Feb 21, 2007 - 1:33 PM GMT

Quote:

"Monadnock" is a geological term for an isolated peak (Mt. Ascutney is another example.)
The geological term derived from this mountain, not visca versa. Ascutney is not a monadnock, but a granite monolith amongst mountain ridges and ranges. The term Monadnock is used for mountains that stand alone in a plain, not mountains that stand amongst other mountains like Ascutney does. It's rather amusing to see someone who has no experience skiing somewhere post about it, too.

roger47
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Posted: Feb 21, 2007 - 1:41 PM GMT
Edited: Feb 21, 2007 - 2:31 PM GMT

My first post.
Monadnock is a lovely mountain. I skinned up the Old Ski Trail some years ago -- it's more pleasant in the abstract; in reality it's a rugged uphill requiring good sidestepping technique in addition to skins. And the climb involves some walking, depending on snow cover. If you do this, be prepared to climb half of the distance in your ski boots; and on the descent, it can get very exciting in spots.
Like most of the routes on Monadnock, the first mile is a more-or-less gentle uphill through the woods, the next half-mile is (or seems) straight uphill, and the final leg is over the exposed ledges of the summit ridge. The best skiing is low down; the most challenging skiing is on the middle section; the upper mountain is usually to be walked.
Nice to have done, but not something that cries out for a repeat - at least on skis. Snowshoes are better for the middle and upper slopes, which involve a lot of clambering.
The open forests around the lower slopes of the mountain are great for skiing - on the trails, which get beat up from hikers, but also off-track, although I don't know if Andy likes skiers to go banging off through the woods.
(Note on skins: Originally these were made of sealskin, long strips at first tied, then later stuck to the base of skis with strong adhesive; this sticky stuff stays on the back of the skins when they are pulled off for the run back down. Nowadays skins are made of synthetic material. They're amazing for climbing. And they're widely available. Some friends buy one pair, slit each skin in half the long way, sew an attachment tab onto the end, and save some dough.)
rocket21
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Posted: Feb 21, 2007 - 1:51 PM GMT
Edited: Feb 21, 2007 - 1:53 PM GMT

Quote:

The geological term derived from this mountain, not visca versa. Ascutney is not a monadnock, but a granite monolith amongst mountain ridges and ranges.


The word monadnock comes from a Native American word (for the NH mountain) for an isolated mountain that isn't part of a connected range, etc.

Mt. Ascutney is considered Vermont's only monadnock.

Take a look at it - its out there on its own, just like Monadnock. Sure, there are other mountains near it, but there are also mountains near Monadnock (the Packs, Temple, etc.). If you look at the topography, both have tremendous vertical prominence in all directions.

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Bill29
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Posted: Feb 21, 2007 - 2:27 PM GMT

Quote: "The geological term derived from this mountain, not visca versa. Ascutney is not a monadnock, but a granite monolith amongst mountain ridges and ranges. The term Monadnock is used for mountains that stand alone in a plain, not mountains that stand amongst other mountains like Ascutney does."

I'll let you people fight amongst yourselves about Ascutney. Mt. Wachusett is a monadnock. And, isn't Monadnock Mountain in Vermont's Northeast Kingdom, across the Connecticut River from Colebrook, N.H., a monadnock? If not, why the name?
mapnut
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Posted: Feb 21, 2007 - 3:10 PM GMT

Yeah Bill, Monadnock Mt. looks like it should qualify from the Vermont point of view. But maybe it's disqualified because it's considered connected to the range across the river.
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Bill29
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Posted: Feb 21, 2007 - 3:45 PM GMT

mapnut, you make a very good point, probably because you actually know what you're talking about. Thanks for the map and information.
roger47
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Posted: Feb 21, 2007 - 4:00 PM GMT

Is this too pedantic? William M. Davis, a 19th-century American geologist, is credited with borrowing the term "Monadnock" from the southern New Hampshire mountain and applying it to a specific geographic feature: namely, a mountain that is left standing alone above a surrounding plain eroded away by the action of glaciation and subsequent ice melt.
I dunno if Ascutney's a monadnock under this definition.
Or if the other Monadnock is, either.
But I imagine there are lots of 'em out there.

weedywart
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Posted: Feb 22, 2007 - 10:34 AM GMT
Edited: Feb 24, 2007 - 1:09 PM GMT

Quote:


Mt. Ascutney is considered Vermont's only monadnock.

Take a look at it - its out there on its own, just like Monadnock. Sure, there are other mountains near it, but there are also mountains near Monadnock (the Packs, Temple, etc.). If you look at the topography, both have tremendous vertical prominence in all directions.
Who, by the way, other than you considers it a Monadnock? Show me a quote from a credible geologist that regards it as a Monadnock, and I'll try and accept your claim. It's a granite monolith amongst metamorphic rock. Your description of it and Monadnock may be correct, but it isn't scientific. I have been all over and around Ascutney, Monodnack, Wachusetts and thousands of other mountains and mountain ranges. Ascutney stands out not because it is isolated, but because it is bulky. Glaciation didn't erode it as much as it did the surrounding mountains because it was granite. However, the other mountains still stand. The Packs, Temple, etc. form a separate range which clearly are isolated from Monadnock when seen from a distance.
Quote:
Is this too pedantic? William M. Davis, a 19th-century American geologist, is credited with borrowing the term "Monadnock" from the southern New Hampshire mountain and applying it to a specific geographic feature: namely, a mountain that is left standing alone above a surrounding plain eroded away by the action of glaciation and subsequent ice melt.
I dunno if Ascutney's a monadnock under this definition.
Or if the other Monadnock is, either.
But I imagine there are lots of 'em out there.
There is no surrounding peneplain at Ascutney. In fact the glaciation there left the Conn. river valley, contributary valleys and what looks like an outwash plain, but not a peneplain. This isn't pedantic, it's academic. However, if one provides incorrect information on the web, it should be pointed out as such. The naming of the other Monadnock may have predated the general use of the term amongst geologists. Finally, since Monadnock prabably has been climbed by more people than any other mountain in the world excepting Fiji in Japan according to the state of N.H., it isn't uncommon to find people who know what the summit is like. However, it is uncommon to find people who have skied it. This thread was started as a search for people who can describe it from that point of view, not any other.

Talisman
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Posted: Feb 22, 2007 - 1:39 PM GMT

This from Wikipedia on Ascutney being a monadnock:

Mount Ascutney, (elevation, 3144ft). Though not the highest peak in Windsor County, Vermont (that honor falling to Gillespie Peak to the west), Mount Ascutney is the state's only monadnock, or lone mountain. Particularly noteworthy about the mountain is its granite outcrops, one of which, at its peak, serves as a launching point for hang-gliders. The mountain is very steep, and its trails traverse a Vermont state forest.



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