Loon to Replace Gondola Cabins

Loon to Replace Gondola Cabins
Existing gondola cabins are being auctioned to season pass holders.
Tuesday, June 26, 2018, NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com



Loon Mountain will be replacing its gondola cabins this off season, according to a message sent to season passholders.

Loon season passholders have been given the first opportunity to buy the cabins this month. Cabins are generally priced at $1,250, and do not include the hanger or rack, making for easier transportation.

New four passenger gondola cabins will be installed this off season. The Doppelmayr lift was installed new in 1988.

Loon is the third New England area to upgrade its gondola cabins in recent years. Stratton replaced the cabins on its 1988 Poma gondola in 2014 and Killington is set to replace the cabins on its 1997 Poma K1 gondola this off season.

Located in Lincoln, Loon Mountain is the most popular ski resort in New Hampshire in terms of visitation. Boyne USA Resorts purchased the area this spring after leasing it from CNL Lifestyle Properties and Ski Resort Holdings since 2007.

Tip: ZM

Comments

  • On Liftblog.com
    Collin
    June 26, 2018 / 7:40 pm
    http://www.newenglandskiindustry.com/viewstory.php?storyid=699
    They’re going to replace the cabins this fall. My take is that this is a crazy bad investment. The one big problem in Loon’s lift system is that the gondola has horrible capacity and the cabins are too light so it shuts down for wind often. A new gondola with 8 passenger cabins and a higher capacity would eliminate the need to upgrade any of their other lifts and since their clientele prefers to ride the gondola over the chairs, it would be the best investment from a customer experience standpoint.
    Keep in mind this is all happening while Big Sky is getting one of the most expensive lifts North America has ever seen, and they’re hinting at getting even more D-Line lifts in future years. Meanwhile, Loon gets to keep their 30 year old main lift with less capacity than a double chair, but with slightly more comfortable cabins which means it won’t be replaced for a long long time. It made sense to replace cabins at Stratton and Killington since both are 8 passenger gondolas and have sufficient capacity, but Loon needs to fully replace the lift and at least double the capacity. I guess Boyne only cares about making these big PR splashes at Big Sky while they run their other resorts into the ground and fail to complete much needed upgrades. Look I’m all for more D-Line lifts being installed in North America, but not at the expense of the other resorts being low-balled or neglected. Since they’re ignoring this critical need for Loon, one can only infer that they will ignore other lift needs like Barker and Sunday River and either a new gondola or additional detachables at Sugarloaf.
    Boyne has no clue what they are doing.
    Sorry for the rant, but it’s gotta be said. Anyone else think this is a bad investment?
  • What is the price comparison with a heated bubble chair? Those are popular it seems, though my guess is orders of magnitude more expensive than retrofitting gondola cabins. Long-term, though, may be better option?
  • edited June 27
    TomWhite said:


    Boyne has no clue what they are doing.
    Sorry for the rant, but it’s gotta be said. Anyone else think this is a bad investment?

    Maybe it's not an "investment" -- perhaps it's just maintenance?

    Does Loon's profitability warrant a major upgrade? I know the weekend crowds do, but that's just part of the story. I've only skied Loon during the week, midwinter, and it was quiet. Glad I didn't have to wait for any lifts. Plus I got to ride in the engine on the locomotive in the empty parking lot! Can't imagine Big Sky is ever as vacant as Loon was that February day.

    Understand the sentiment and frustration toward Boyne from the Loon "regular" POV, however I don't think Boyne got to where it is by being clueless.

    Unpleasant as it is, it may be that this is the most sensible move from a business profitability point of view.


  • edited June 27
    TomWhite said:



    Loon Mountain will be replacing its gondola cabins this off season, according to a message sent to season passholders.

    I'm a Loon season pass holder. I didn't get that message. What the heck!?!

    Edit: Oops, yes I did, I just trashed it without reading it. I just dug it back out. Here's what it says...

    Pass Holder Exclusive Offer: Claim Your Piece of History
    We have some exciting news to share with you. We’re upgrading our Gondola cabins this summer! Within the next several weeks, we’ll take the existing cabins offline and replace them with a more modern, 4-seat version.

    But what will become of the old Gondola cabins, you ask? Good Question. We’ve decided to put them up for sale – and as a season pass holder, you’ll get a chance to buy before anyone else.

    From June 25-30, you’ll be able to purchase a Gondola cabin online

    Whether you’ve got plans to turn your Gondola into a Man Cave, She Shed, or backyard treehouse, this is your big chance to own a piece of Loon’s history. Don’t miss out.
  • Here's the rest of the info. Worth it? What would I do with one??

    Loon Mountain Gondola Auction
    This is your chance to own a piece of Loon's history! We're replacing our Gondola cabins this summer, and need to find good homes for the cabins that have served us so well over the years. All cabins for sale are from Loon's second-generation Doppelmayr gondola, which began transporting passengers to the summit of Loon Peak during the 1988/89 season. Just find a cabin you like and place a bid.

    CABIN DETAILS
    All gondola cabins are unique and have their own sets of blemishes, imperfections, etc.:
    -Cabin weight: 460 lbs.
    -Dimensions: 7 ft. tall, 5 ft. wide, 6 ft. deep
    -No top hanger
    -No ski rack on left door.
    -Cabins are fastened to wood pallet to assist with transportation.
  • Several of us discussed increasing lift capacity out of the main base (Loon Chondola p.3). Sully had a good alternative to upgrading the gondi. Replace Seven Brothers with a HSQ and slightly lengthen it. With easy access to East Basin and North Peak, this would be a two lift alternative to the summit(s) especially when the gondi is crowded.
  • edited June 27
    I think replacing Seven Brothers up to Rolling Bear or even up to the same height as the Kanc is more cost effective than replacing the entire gondola.
  • Increasing the uphill capacity at Loon should not be a consideration. Loon's slopes are dangerously overcrowded as it is already. Lift lines are the only thing keeping the slopes even remotely bearable and safe
  • Man Cave, She Shed. lol
    You ski because even if you don't do it well, it's still a blast....
  • > @Cannonball said:
    > Increasing the uphill capacity at Loon should not be a consideration. Loon's slopes are dangerously overcrowded as it is already. Lift lines are the only thing keeping the slopes even remotely bearable and safe


    You know that's a really good point I haven't thought much about. The gondi has major capacity problems, but then again the trails are already dangerous on weekends and holidays.

    To anyone thinking overall this is not worth it, if Loon doesn't warrant this level of upgrade then no NH mountain does because Loon prints money like no other area in the state. I totally agree with the sentiment that this is bad long term because it means the gondola is going nowhere, but anyone that skis there knows it would be a major $20 million dollar plus project involving a new base lodge and years of work.
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