Saddleback aims to open

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Comments

  • obienickobienick expert
    Posts: 938
    I think it stems from his passing the "no trespassing" signs Cannon puts up in the summer to doccument the alledged "environmental destruction" at Mittersill.
  • newpylongnewpylong expert
    edited November 12 Posts: 564
    JS he has written articles using information obtained by walking on private property without owner permission. Pictures taken by others have been lifted and placed in said articles without permission or credit. Not talking about Cannon, but the place I work.

    So not high on my list.
  • ciscokidciscokid expert
    Posts: 1,486
    Nothing but respect for the rocket,
    Learn more on NE ski history than anywhere else, thorough.

    Joined Alpine zone couple years ago and he was first( and only) one to say hi , welcome.
    Really doesn't want to rock the SJ boat anymore, too busy for pidly stuff like I'm doing here. I walk into ski areas all the time and take pics and post

    Yea corroborate ⛷⛷⛷
  • joshua_segaljoshua_segal expert
    Posts: 1,802
    newpylong said:

    JS he has written articles using information obtained by walking on private property without owner permission. Pictures taken by others have been lifted and placed in said articles without permission or credit. Not talking about Cannon, but the place I work.

    So not high on my list.

    Posting "no trespassing" signs on public land is probably not legally binding; but it is an effective scare tactic to keep people away.

    Beyond that, most of what you said above is just not true and suspect that your anger is fueled by a negative comment (which turned out to be true) about Whaleback.

    If you want to continue this discussion, let's take it to IMs 
  • ciscokidciscokid expert
    Posts: 1,486
    mapnut said:

    Well shit.

    Yea and when Map cries doodoo I'm not a happy camper, I look up to him!(not litterally) and when Paul Harvey and Yogi's name come up you know it's serious ⛷
  • newpylongnewpylong expert
    edited November 12 Posts: 564

    newpylong said:

    JS he has written articles using information obtained by walking on private property without owner permission. Pictures taken by others have been lifted and placed in said articles without permission or credit. Not talking about Cannon, but the place I work.

    So not high on my list.

    Posting "no trespassing" signs on public land is probably not legally binding; but it is an effective scare tactic to keep people away.

    Beyond that, most of what you said above is just not true and suspect that your anger is fueled by a negative comment (which turned out to be true) about Whaleback.

    If you want to continue this discussion, let's take it to IMs 
    Would be happy to provide more information privately regarding your middle comment if you wish.

  • ski_itski_it expert
    Posts: 1,740
    I see copyrighted images posted on here from time to as well. Of course we're not trying to earn a buck off it either
    ISNE-I Skied New England | NESAP-the New England Ski Area Project | SOSA-Saving Our Ski Areas - Location SW of Boston MA
  • mapnutmapnut expert
    Posts: 822
    ciscokid said:

    mapnut said:

    Well shit.

    and when Paul Harvey and Yogi's name come up you know it's serious ⛷


    Saddleback came to a fork in the road, and they shouldn't have taken it.
  • powderstudpowderstud intermediate
    Posts: 37
    It's sounding more and more like the Saddleback Mountain Foundation may get another shot at putting a non-profit coop together.  I'm wondering how much due diligence was ever done on Majella.
  • TomWhiteTomWhite advanced
    Posts: 476
    Nothing new here. As I read the $40 mill. in investments, it made me wonder more about the Rangeley. I don't recall any report of dramatic failure. Why did the lift problem come up all of a sudden? How did the Berrys invest so much, yet overlook Rangeley needs/problems? It has always seemed odd to me.

    As ski season approaches, purchase of Saddleback not yet complete

    The base lodge at Saddleback Mountain.

    RANGELEY - Nearly five months after an Australian company announced it would purchase Saddleback Mountain, the sale has yet to be finalized. The how and when of the ski resort's reopening remains unknown.

    On June 28, the Majella Group, a company owned by Australian businessman Sebastian Monsour that is headquartered in Brisbane, and the mountain's current owners, the Berry family, announced at a joint press conference that Majella Group would be purchasing all of the resort's assets, including the lodge, lifts and surrounding 6,337 acres of land. Majella Group had signed an asset purchase agreement and it was announced at that time that the sale would likely be completed later that summer.

    In a statement released in late June, Majella Group Chief Executive Officer Sebastian Monsour said that whether the ski mountain opened for the 2017-18 season had yet to be determined, although the company did recognize the upcoming ski season was a priority for the region. Majella Group also announced that it would be replacing an essential, four-person chairlift as well as a second T-bar lift.

    Locally, the announcement was met with relief. Saddleback Mountain failed to open for the 2015-16 ski season after owners announced an inability to secure $3 million in financing to purchase a new four-person chairlift. The Berry family has owned the resort since 2004, investing more than $40 million in infrastructure improvements and employing approximately 300 people during the resort's peak winter season.

    Over the previous two years, rumors swirled about potential buyers. A number of local business owners and regional stakeholders formed a nonprofit foundation with an eye toward purchasing the mountain with a combination of memberships and donations.

    In an update posted to Saddleback Maine's Facebook page, Monsour said that delays had impacted the company's timeline, although it was continuing to move toward finalizing the sale and was now working through the final stages. The delays were on Majella Group's end, Monsour said, rather than the Berry family's.

    "We are incredibly thankful to the Berry family and their advisors for their ongoing patience, kindness and support," Monsour wrote. "I am whole heartedly committed to this deal."

    There has been some progress on the mountain itself. The existing Rangeley lift was taken down earlier this fall and trails were mowed for the first time in two years.

    While Majella Group had hoped to replace the chairlift this year, that replacement would be delayed until next season. Monsour said that while the company recognized that the investment was an important one for the mountain, it wanted additional time to review different lift options, including a detachable versus a fixed grip lift.

    Majella Group remains committed to opening this season, but in "some capacity," rather than a full opening.

    "This will not be a full opening, rather a limited operation that, if possible, will allow our Saddlebackers and their families to return and enjoy the mountain in some capacity this season," Monsour wrote.

    http://www.dailybulldog.com/db/features/as-ski-season-approaches-purchase-of-saddleback-not-yet-complete/

  • obienickobienick expert
    Posts: 938
    I agree it never made any sense. They upgraded the lodge massively. They tripled the size of the bunny slopes. They installed a new upper mountain lift. They heavily invested in snowmaking. And yet the most vital link was left to break?
  • Posts: 2,011
    Saddleback Mountain Foundation Receives 501(c)(3) Non Profit Status

    The organization remains 'alive and well' despite being passed over by Saddleback's owners earlier this year.

    Tuesday, November 14, 2017, NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com


    In a Facebook post today, Saddleback Mountain Foundation Executive Director Crystal Canney announced the organization has received IRS 501(c)(3) status, making it a tax exempt entity that is "very much alive and well."

    Saddleback's current owners, the Berry family, closed the ski area after the 2014-15 season when they were unable to obtain financing to replace the aging Rangeley chairlift.

    Saddleback Mountain Foundation was reserved as a potential non-profit entity in October 2016, as part of a larger effort with the Trust for Public Land and Saddleback Mountain Community Resort (SMCR) to purchase and reopen the ski area. The New England Forestry Foundation later became involved in the transaction.

    In October 2016, the Berry family announced "We continue to work with the Saddleback Mountain Foundation, in addition to the other qualified buyers who are also in the process of pursuing the purchase of the resort."

    On June 20, 2017, Saddleback Mountain Foundation President Peter Stein wrote, "We had a Letter of Intent with the owner that was ready for signature way-back-when and we stand ready to dust that off and continue the negotiations. My dear Saddlebackers, we have everything we need for success except that signed agreement."

    On June 28, 2017, the Berry family announced Saddleback was instead being sold to the Majella Group, with an expected completion date later in the summer. However, on November 9, Majella announced the sale and planned lift installation had been delayed. Majella claims it will operate the area as a "limited operation" this winter "if possible."

    http://www.newenglandskiindustry.com/viewstory.php?storyid=622
    - Sam
  • joshua_segaljoshua_segal expert
    edited November 16 Posts: 1,802

    Saddleback Mountain Foundation Receives 501(c)(3) Non Profit Status

    The organization remains 'alive and well' despite being passed over by Saddleback's owners earlier this year.

    Tuesday, November 14, 2017, NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com


    In a Facebook post today, Saddleback Mountain Foundation Executive Director Crystal Canney announced the organization has received IRS 501(c)(3) status, making it a tax exempt entity that is "very much alive and well."

    Saddleback's current owners, the Berry family, closed the ski area after the 2014-15 season when they were unable to obtain financing to replace the aging Rangeley chairlift.

    Saddleback Mountain Foundation was reserved as a potential non-profit entity in October 2016, as part of a larger effort with the Trust for Public Land and Saddleback Mountain Community Resort (SMCR) to purchase and reopen the ski area. The New England Forestry Foundation later became involved in the transaction.

    In October 2016, the Berry family announced "We continue to work with the Saddleback Mountain Foundation, in addition to the other qualified buyers who are also in the process of pursuing the purchase of the resort."

    On June 20, 2017, Saddleback Mountain Foundation President Peter Stein wrote, "We had a Letter of Intent with the owner that was ready for signature way-back-when and we stand ready to dust that off and continue the negotiations. My dear Saddlebackers, we have everything we need for success except that signed agreement."

    On June 28, 2017, the Berry family announced Saddleback was instead being sold to the Majella Group, with an expected completion date later in the summer. However, on November 9, Majella announced the sale and planned lift installation had been delayed. Majella claims it will operate the area as a "limited operation" this winter "if possible."

    http://www.newenglandskiindustry.com/viewstory.php?storyid=622

    The above is a nice, concise review/summation of the last 6 months.  The key important new point is the receiving of the 501(c)3 status, which gives them a legal way to raise tax exempt donations to make it happen.
  • TomWhiteTomWhite advanced
    Posts: 476
    I missed this from 11/10 on NESI (photos removed).

    Majella Announces Delay in Saddleback Sale, Construction
    The fate of the Maine ski resort remains unknown.
    Friday, November 10, 2017, NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com


    In a Facebook post yesterday, Majella Group CEO Sebastian Monsour disclosed further delays in the long anticipated Saddleback sale, adding that it "has been on our end and not the Berry's [sic]." Monsour also announced that the Rangeley chairlift replacement will not be constructed this year, and that Majella's committed opening of the mountain this season "will not be a full opening, rather a limited operation that, if possible, will allow our Saddlebackers and their families to return and enjoy the mountain in some capacity."

    In July 2015, the Berry family, owners of Saddleback, announced the Rangeley double was "at end of its useful life" and that operations would cease if the lift could not be replaced. The lift was not replaced and the ski area sat idle for the following two winters.
    On June 28, 2017, the Berry family announced Saddleback was being sold to the Majella Group. At that time, Majella announced the sale would be completed later in the summer and that a new fixed grip quad chairlift and T-Bar would be installed in 2017. At the time, Majella did not commit to operating in 2017-18.

    On September 18, 2017, Majella declared "dominoes have fallen into place" and that "physical work is starting" and that "the first step will be taking down the existing Rangeley lift." As of November, the lift has not been taken down. Majella is now suggesting it may instead replace the lift with a more expensive high speed detachable quad.

    Also on September 18, with regard to a 2017-18 reopening, Majella posted, "only thing that is going to hold up or delay this process is Mother Nature" and that Majella was "committed to opening in some capacity for the 2017-18 ski season, assuming Mother Nature does not deliver an early winter with heavy snow."


    The continued delays and references to weather recall Majella's Mountview Residences project in Australia, where construction was reportedly supposed to be completed in 2011. That year, The Courier Mail reported that Sebastian Monsour blamed delays of the $25 million project on the weather, but insisted the development would go ahead. Majella later announced construction would begin in 2014. As of 2017, construction has yet to begin.

    Majella's United States office, the former Williston-West Church in Portland, was acquired in December 2011. Months later, Monsour expressed interest to Portland Mayor Michael Brennan to start a large scale development on the waterfront. The Portland Press Herald reported that the Mayor "expressed skepticism." One year later, the City of Portland slapped its first lien on the Majella office building for unpaid taxes.

    While reporting on the waterfront and church projects in 2012, the Portland Press Herald reported that, "Majella Property Development bills itself as the leading developer in southeast Queensland, Australia." Majella Property Development's only completed project in Australia was the controversial Radius Apartments development, which was started in 2012 and completed in 2014.

  • mapnutmapnut expert
    Posts: 822
    If you look at the NESI link, the story has a photo of a little house in Brisbane that purports to be Majella's global headquarters. I looked up the address of the headquarters on Majella's own website, found it on ACME Mapper, and it is indeed that little house. NESI may have good reason to be skeptical of Majella.
  • rickbolgerrickbolger expert
    Posts: 1,118
    mapnut said:

    If you look at the NESI link, the story has a photo of a little house in Brisbane that purports to be Majella's global headquarters. I looked up the address of the headquarters on Majella's own website, found it on ACME Mapper, and it is indeed that little house. NESI may have good reason to be skeptical of Majella.

    Little house, big house, doesn't matter --  Anybody who says they're going to "turn Saddleback into the premier ski resort in North America" is either a) lying, b) a lunatic, c) delusional, or d) an all-powerful god or comic superhero
  • mapnutmapnut expert
    Posts: 822
    But, but Les Otten is going to turn The Balsams into the same thing! Does that mean Killington, Stowe etc. will have to close?
  • joshua_segaljoshua_segal expert
    edited November 17 Posts: 1,802

    mapnut said:

    If you look at the NESI link, the story has a photo of a little house in Brisbane that purports to be Majella's global headquarters. I looked up the address of the headquarters on Majella's own website, found it on ACME Mapper, and it is indeed that little house. NESI may have good reason to be skeptical of Majella.

    Little house, big house, doesn't matter --  Anybody who says they're going to "turn Saddleback into the premier ski resort in North America" is either a) lying, b) a lunatic, c) delusional, or d) an all-powerful god or comic superhero
    A number of areas in ME have concluded that the way forward for Saddleback is the model of BMOM - and I think Camden and Squaw may be in the category, that their value is as a community asset as opposed to a profit center.  I think a reasonable analysis of the skier visit data will show that the Rangeley region can barely support one mega-resort (Sugarloaf).
  • rickbolgerrickbolger expert
    Posts: 1,118
    mapnut said:

    But, but Les Otten is going to turn The Balsams into the same thing! Does that mean Killington, Stowe etc. will have to close?

    Balsams is also a pipe dream, but if you were forced to bet on one of these smoke & mirror projects, would you pick the eccentric guy who's actually done it (albeit went down in flames), or a dreamer peddling EB5 visas in Australia with no ski biz experience?


  • mapnutmapnut expert
    Posts: 822
    I'll concede that point.
  • obienickobienick expert
    edited November 17 Posts: 938
    Balsams was losing money before it closed because it hadn't been updated and was getting quite anachronistic.  Nostalgic? Sure. A great resort and hotel? Sure. But no TVs in rooms. Family unfriendly (not the employees, but the facilities).  

    Issues stemmed from the death of old man Tillotson, a lack of investment, Bretton Woods winterizing the Mt. Washington Hotel, the overall resort real estate boom of the late 90s, and a family feud which kept the kid who was actually interested in running the place unable to gain control.  No reason Balsams *can't* get back to the glory days, especially with the resort expansion. 

    *Some* parts of the plan are a little cooky. But you're forgetting LBO built SR to what it is when everyone thoguht it was a backwater tiny surface-lift-only area.

    Last I heard they are very close to having the minimum units sold to unlock the non-state financing.
  • joshua_segaljoshua_segal expert
    Posts: 1,802
    obienick said:

    ...


    Last I heard they are very close to having the minimum units sold to unlock the non-state financing.
    I heard they surpassed it.
  • lotsoskiinglotsoskiing expert
    Posts: 750

    mapnut said:

    If you look at the NESI link, the story has a photo of a little house in Brisbane that purports to be Majella's global headquarters. I looked up the address of the headquarters on Majella's own website, found it on ACME Mapper, and it is indeed that little house. NESI may have good reason to be skeptical of Majella.

    Little house, big house, doesn't matter --  Anybody who says they're going to "turn Saddleback into the premier ski resort in North America" is either a) lying, b) a lunatic, c) delusional, or d) an all-powerful god or comic superhero
    A number of areas in ME have concluded that the way forward for Saddleback is the model of BMOH - and I think Camden and Squaw may be in the category, that their value is as a community asset as opposed to a profit center.  I think a reasonable analysis of the skier visit data will show that the Rangeley region can barely support one mega-resort (Sugarloaf).
    bmoh?
  • Posts: 2,011

    mapnut said:

    If you look at the NESI link, the story has a photo of a little house in Brisbane that purports to be Majella's global headquarters. I looked up the address of the headquarters on Majella's own website, found it on ACME Mapper, and it is indeed that little house. NESI may have good reason to be skeptical of Majella.

    Little house, big house, doesn't matter --  Anybody who says they're going to "turn Saddleback into the premier ski resort in North America" is either a) lying, b) a lunatic, c) delusional, or d) an all-powerful god or comic superhero
    A number of areas in ME have concluded that the way forward for Saddleback is the model of BMOH - and I think Camden and Squaw may be in the category, that their value is as a community asset as opposed to a profit center.  I think a reasonable analysis of the skier visit data will show that the Rangeley region can barely support one mega-resort (Sugarloaf).
    bmoh?

    Do you mean Black Mountain of Maine?
    - Sam
  • lotsoskiinglotsoskiing expert
    Posts: 750

    mapnut said:

    But, but Les Otten is going to turn The Balsams into the same thing! Does that mean Killington, Stowe etc. will have to close?

    Balsams is also a pipe dream, but if you were forced to bet on one of these smoke & mirror projects, would you pick the eccentric guy who's actually done it (albeit went down in flames), or a dreamer peddling EB5 visas in Australia with no ski biz experience?


    I wouldn't bet against Les, but it does seem like a big pull, even for someone like him who did resurrect SR and turn it into a behemoth. Not sure if the same can be done in Dixville Notch, but will be interesting to follow.
  • newpylongnewpylong expert
    Posts: 564

    mapnut said:

    If you look at the NESI link, the story has a photo of a little house in Brisbane that purports to be Majella's global headquarters. I looked up the address of the headquarters on Majella's own website, found it on ACME Mapper, and it is indeed that little house. NESI may have good reason to be skeptical of Majella.

    Little house, big house, doesn't matter --  Anybody who says they're going to "turn Saddleback into the premier ski resort in North America" is either a) lying, b) a lunatic, c) delusional, or d) an all-powerful god or comic superhero
    A number of areas in ME have concluded that the way forward for Saddleback is the model of BMOM - and I think Camden and Squaw may be in the category, that their value is as a community asset as opposed to a profit center.  I think a reasonable analysis of the skier visit data will show that the Rangeley region can barely support one mega-resort (Sugarloaf).
    The big difference between the areas cited and Saddleback is the size and scope. I am not confident that Saddleback is "compact enough" (actual size, snowmaking footprint, lift footprint, base facility footprint) to effectively be run as a community non-profit.

    Though that is just my opinion and any operator giving it a go is better than being shuttered.
  • joshua_segaljoshua_segal expert
    Posts: 1,802
    newpylong said:

    mapnut said:

    If you look at the NESI link, the story has a photo of a little house in Brisbane that purports to be Majella's global headquarters. I looked up the address of the headquarters on Majella's own website, found it on ACME Mapper, and it is indeed that little house. NESI may have good reason to be skeptical of Majella.

    Little house, big house, doesn't matter --  Anybody who says they're going to "turn Saddleback into the premier ski resort in North America" is either a) lying, b) a lunatic, c) delusional, or d) an all-powerful god or comic superhero
    A number of areas in ME have concluded that the way forward for Saddleback is the model of BMOM - and I think Camden and Squaw may be in the category, that their value is as a community asset as opposed to a profit center.  I think a reasonable analysis of the skier visit data will show that the Rangeley region can barely support one mega-resort (Sugarloaf).
    The big difference between the areas cited and Saddleback is the size and scope. I am not confident that Saddleback is "compact enough" (actual size, snowmaking footprint, lift footprint, base facility footprint) to effectively be run as a community non-profit.

    Though that is just my opinion and any operator giving it a go is better than being shuttered.
    The actual ski area is a bit under 400 acres, less than  half of Sunday River; less than 1/3 the acreage of Sugarloaf.
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