I need new hardware

ski_itski_it expert
in NELSAP Forum Posts: 1,805
We don't have many gear posts. Not sure why as this isn't Ski Magazine or an FIS World Cup broadcast.

Well I guess if this old guy is going to keep skiing I'm going to have to retire my old tiger skis. I'd hate to do it, as they served me well as my first shaped set of skis, but after epoxying in an edge last season, filling in. .5 x 3" void in the base, and having basically no edges remaining to sharpen, I guess it's time... You'd think I'd like buying skis but it's more like a trip to the dentist for this old cheap Yankee. There's so many brands, models, years out there it's incredible. And demos are kinda of like wine tasting to me. But it is was great at the vineyard!?!?

So any recommendations ?
ISNE-I Skied New England | NESAP-the New England Ski Area Project | SOSA-Saving Our Ski Areas - Location SW of Boston MA

Comments

  • loafasaurloafasaur intermediate
    Posts: 29
    Step 1:  Go to Demo Day.  Try as many skis as possible, consulting with the tekkies on what you should like.  If the choice is between ski length and a model you might like, go with the long ski in the right model.  Skip lunch.  Ignore screaming legs in pm.

    Step 2:  Go online and buy your favorite in last year's paint.
  • riverc0ilriverc0il advanced
    edited September 16 Posts: 267
    A demo day is the way to go for sure. Narrow down your focus before you go by deciding what segment of ski you are interested in (general purpose groomer only, "cheater" faster hard pack ski, jack of all trades on piste, off piste and natural snow focus, park, do you need/want a twin, etc.). Every ski is a compromise, determine what type of performance you prefer. And then every brand probably has at least one model to offer you within your desired segment, probably more than one. You'll need to determine how stiff you want a ski and your preference on Ti or not but I think you need to determine that by feel while actually trying different skis if you don't know off hand. 

    After you narrow things down to 1-3 models you like, follow up a demo day by a full day demo of the individual skis you liked best. The entire process can be time consuming and a bit pricey once you start demoing individual skis. But I find once you've done an exhaustive search like that, you generally don't need to bother with it again because you get to know what you like and dislike. 

    And if you don't think you'll be able to feel the difference, then skip the demo and just buy whatever top sheet appeals to you the most. Buy towards the end of the season when prices are coming down or last year's model as loafasaur suggests. I don't think I have bought a current year model in about 15 years, and I have owned a lot of different skis during that time frame!
  • rickbolgerrickbolger expert
    edited September 19 Posts: 1,153
    One way you can potentially narrow your focus a bit is to try and figure out the lineage from whatever ski you were on (Tiger?  sounds like Volkl?)  and, if you really liked the way that skied, test out whatever it has become.  Might have evolved into the RTM line but not sure.  They still use that name for race skis but I'm guessing you were on the all mountain ski from back in the day

    I've done this with Dynastar skis beginning with the 4 x 4 and gone through a couple generations of Legend this and that and generally been pleased with each as I go, seems to suit me.   As I recall it was none other than Mr. riverc0il who urged me to try the Legend 8000 when my Intuitivs were getting frayed.   

    This may not work for everyone but it could be a sensible way to start the search,  try out one of the RTMs with appropriate waist for whatever and wherever you ski most
  • SkizixSkizix advanced
    Posts: 155
    Demo days are great when you can make it and the weather & conditions are good. Since no company sponsors me and gives me skis I have no allegiance with any one brand.  I've had very positive experience from reading the ski reviews on RealSkiers.com and use it to help me choose skis.

    Well worth the $20.  

    For myself who is a carving addict, I discovered that Slalom race skis are just what I need and love to ski on. Prior to that I would never have considered a race ski because I thought they were too specific and well beyond my skill set. After reading dozens of reviews I decided on Head Rebels i.slRD for my everyday ski. They work wonders for me and I am quick to say "It's the ski, not the skier." HaHa I notice most people are basically GS skiers so keep that in mind while looking...there's a ski out there for everyone and just because I love my Rebels does not mean you will. 
    "I need a powder day"
  • SkizixSkizix advanced
    Posts: 155

    One way you can potentially narrow your focus a bit is to try and figure out the lineage from whatever ski you were on (Tiger?  sounds like Volkl?)  and, if you really liked the way that skied, test out whatever it has become.  Might have evolved into the RTM line but not sure.  They still use that name for race skis but I'm guessing you were on the all mountain ski from back in the day


    I've done this with Dynastar skis beginning with the 4 x 4 and gone through a couple generations of Legend this and that and generally been pleased with each as I go, seems to suit me.   As I recall it was none other than Mr. riverc0il who urged me to try the Legend 8000 when my Intuitivs were getting frayed.   

    This may not work for everyone but it could be a sensible way to start the search,  try out one of the RTMs with appropriate waist for whatever and wherever you ski most
    This is in part how I ended up with the Head Rebels. The dimensions are similar to my old Rossignol T-Power Vipers. Although when looking at today's skis with a waist less than 70mm the choices are slim (pun intended)
    "I need a powder day"
  • ski_itski_it expert
    edited September 19 Posts: 1,805
    Great suggestions, thanks everyone.
    But Rick I'm really hurt that with the all the pics of my skis I've posted with each & every trip report you don't know what brand they are. ;)
    When I met Nelsbeer he looked down and said something like "Oh I had a pair of those once...a decade back".
    :D (ok maybe that's not exactly right. He's much more diplomatic.)
    I probably can't wait for the demos but I agree that's a great way to narrow it down. Then again demos can be like wine tasting. When you open the bottle back at home...but it tasted so great at the vineyard??!?
    I've looked into those Heads as I've owned several SL skis in the past. But you're right I'm much more a GS skier. Mostly cruising these days but I feel like I want something lighter & quicker turning than my Elan Magfire 12s.
    ISNE-I Skied New England | NESAP-the New England Ski Area Project | SOSA-Saving Our Ski Areas - Location SW of Boston MA
  • joshua_segaljoshua_segal expert
    Posts: 1,875
    ski_it said:

    Great suggestions,...When I met Nelsbeer he looked down and said something like "Oh I had a pair of those once...a decade back".
    :D (ok maybe that's not exactly right. He's much more diplomatic.)  ...

    People like nelsbeer who are 100+ day per season skiers have to update equipment more frequently.  It wears out!
  • ski_itski_it expert
    Posts: 1,805
    This is why I don't like buying equipment so much. One trip down a trail like this and there goes the resale value.image
    ISNE-I Skied New England | NESAP-the New England Ski Area Project | SOSA-Saving Our Ski Areas - Location SW of Boston MA
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  • joshua_segaljoshua_segal expert
    Posts: 1,875
    ski_it said:

    This is why I don't like buying equipment so much. One trip down a trail like this and there goes the resale value. 

    That's why late and early season skiers need to have a pair of junk skis - and you need them also, if you are going to ski glades or natural snow trails before the deep snow of February/early-March!
  • teighsteighs intermediate
    Posts: 70
    You should have 4 pair of skis in your quiver:  Your good rock skis, your OK rock skis, your beater rock skis, and the pair that only comes out for pristine conditions.
  • rickbolgerrickbolger expert
    Posts: 1,153
    Those Elans look fine to me, what's the issue?   :D
  • joshua_segaljoshua_segal expert
    Posts: 1,875

    Those Elans look fine to me, what's the issue?   :D

    Tops always look better than the bottom! That be said, I haven't seen the bottoms, but I am making an assumption!
  • ski_itski_it expert
    edited September 20 Posts: 1,805
    teighs said:

    You should have 4 pair of skis in your quiver:  Your good rock skis, your OK rock skis, your beater rock skis, and the pair that only comes out for pristine conditions.



    I like the way you think!


    joshua said:

    ...or natural snow trails before the deep snow of February/early-March! .


    We get deep snow? That was early March...okay I'm lying, that April 23rd..

    rick said:

    Those Elans look fine to me, what's the issue?


    There's two things for sure, I can always find them in the rack and I don't have to worry about them getting stolen.
    ISNE-I Skied New England | NESAP-the New England Ski Area Project | SOSA-Saving Our Ski Areas - Location SW of Boston MA
  • bmwskierbmwskier advanced
    Posts: 357
    The last two pairs of skis I bought at demo sales at the local ski shop. They have to sell of last year's models and I got both pairs for less than 250.00, bindings included. The only downside is that they are demo bindings-which are a bit heavier than normal ones. Haven't complained a bit about them and I love both pairs-- the Head Flowrides (their older) are awesome for patrolling. 

    I have a couple of pairs of longer skis as well, before going full shaped ski. They have a huge side cut and it's fun to take them out on carving days and let them roll on the groomers. Then, after trail checks I put them away and get out my "work" skis. :-) 

    "Making ski films is being irresponsible with other people's money, in a responsible sort of way..." 
    Greg Stump
  • ciscokidciscokid expert
    Posts: 1,590
    I stopped in a ski shop yesterday to ask for a price of a tuneup for my old heads is 184's and looked at these wide planks Nordica us there were as wide as my feet can't believe how wide they are getting big and tall skiing
  • ski_itski_it expert
    edited October 7 Posts: 1,805
    OMG u r right Cisco. I went to the Outdoor Gear Exchange basement in Burlington last night and the boards are huge!!! 94 at the waist was probably the narrowest. Most were 99-112. IDK I can't see myself at Crotched in January on those behemoths. Maybe Jay on a Powder day. I know they are all rockers and light but IDK if i could ski on them.
    ISNE-I Skied New England | NESAP-the New England Ski Area Project | SOSA-Saving Our Ski Areas - Location SW of Boston MA
  • NELSBEERNELSBEER advanced
    edited October 7 Posts: 274
    I used 2 pairs of ELAN Magfires few years back one year Magfire12 and then Magfire82 Ti.

    Both were heavy, wide and stiff but did whatever I 'told' them to do like they were glued to the hill. I'd get a nice run down a trail weaving and hopping as the spirit moved and then talk to someone who described the slope as a sheet of ice. Great for patrolling on really long days when things tend to get scraped clean in bad places or wide carving. Not a choice for tight moguls or trees. I was able to beat them into spaghetti over a few years, but it took several hundred days of work.

    From those I moved to the ATOMIC Nomad line. Blackeye Ti's are my favorite all purpose mountain ski, last year I added ATOMIC Vantage 83 Ti's. Both were described as redefining ripping the mountain in the magazines and did just that for me, couldn't understand how I was hitting 35 - 45 MPH most runs and even 50 a few times feeling really in control. There are 2 levels of each ski regular and Ti (titanium), the former for whannabes the later for hard driving all mountain skiers.

    One caveat the skis I mentioned are for skiers who really keep their weight where it belongs, carve their turns, get their weight over in bumps and don't relax. I gave my son a pair of NOMADs to try in place of his park skis, it took him a week and a number of sit downs to figure out you don't let the skis get ahead of you for even one second. On boots I went to Atomic HAWX2 with 110 stiffness from ELAN 90's to give better control. looking back I don't miss the Magfires or Elans.

    Prior year or 2 year old skis can be good deals if you can find them. Best selection I have seen has been at the Boston SKI show. They had new (unused) Blackeyes last year that local shops weren't able to get the year they came out at prices that were 50% off list. Get there early and know what you want. Any Blackeye Ti's remaining would be 2 years (or more) old with even better prices; the Vantage 83 would be last years.

    Not to be labeled an ATOMIC bigot I also use a pair of Blizzard Power X8s quite regularly, really nice. All the above are All Mountain Rockers, that aren't behemoths and can handle anything Crotched will throw at you if you keep them reasonably sharp and waxed.   
  • ski_itski_it expert
    Posts: 1,805
    Thanks for the pointers Nels. They actually had some of those used Atomics in the bin here. Perhaps I'll go back and take another look.
    Several ski sales going on up here. An Expo at the Hilton, a 2 day sale at St Mikes College, etc
    ISNE-I Skied New England | NESAP-the New England Ski Area Project | SOSA-Saving Our Ski Areas - Location SW of Boston MA
  • NELSBEERNELSBEER advanced
    Posts: 274
    Check prices on-line for unused skis, some aren't too bad price wise, and you will be experiencing the ski at it's advertised best. Demos usually only get rented out on weekends & holidays, but you never know how many instructors, racers, good customers and managers have 'tried them out' during the week.(Does 'demo' mean demolition or demonstration.)

    I don't sell my old skis, I know they have been beaten to a point where retirement as an Adirondack chair is the most humane direction. I've almost got enough bindings to build a neat looking boot storage wall too...   
  • ski_itski_it expert
    edited October 8 Posts: 1,805
    Mrs Ski it and Miss Ski it enjoying the First ski show of the seasonimage
    They had $49 Pico peak or 2 person Sun-fri non peak. Killington $84 one ticket then 50% any others
    ISNE-I Skied New England | NESAP-the New England Ski Area Project | SOSA-Saving Our Ski Areas - Location SW of Boston MA
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  • ciscokidciscokid expert
    Posts: 1,590
    ski_it said:

    Mrs Ski it and Miss Ski it enjoying the First ski show of the seasonimage
    They had $49 Pico peak or 2 person Sun-fri non peak. Killington $84 one ticket then 50% any others

    Wow you hang w some pretty planks! ⛷⛷⛷
  • ski_itski_it expert
    edited October 18 Posts: 1,805
    Easy there big guy. I'm only accepting interviews from MDs

    So I didn't mention I met Marilyn Cochran Brown at the Ski Expo. In which booth you ask? Why the Cochran Ski Area booth, but of course. She gave me a little history of the beginning of the area (most I already knew but so great to hear it first hand) as I listened intently. I was so excited to meet ski royalty I didn't even think to take a selfie, pic or ask for an autograph. She was so nice it was hard to move on to the other displays.
    You could have picked up a family pass in the silent auction that day for $128. An awesome deal if you live in Betsy land.
    ISNE-I Skied New England | NESAP-the New England Ski Area Project | SOSA-Saving Our Ski Areas - Location SW of Boston MA
  • ski_itski_it expert
    Posts: 1,805
    Volkl Kendos anyone?
    ISNE-I Skied New England | NESAP-the New England Ski Area Project | SOSA-Saving Our Ski Areas - Location SW of Boston MA
  • bubblecufferbubblecuffer advanced
    Posts: 265
    Every high-end ski on the market right now is simply awesome.  Ski technology has evolved so much, just in the past 5 years.  One problem with that is ski shopping has become much more difficult since there are so many niche skis out there for specific situations.  I like general skis - all mountain.

    I have been a Rossignol customer for 30 years.  The Rossignol Experience 88's have been wonderful and if you're an aggressive, or moderate, skier, they will serve you nicely.
  • ski_itski_it expert
    Posts: 1,805

    Good points bubblecuffer. I demo'd 3 pairs today Volkl Kendos & RTM 84s, and some Blizzard Brahmas.They all felt great. They had other Blizzards, Head Kore, Nordica Enforcers, & K2 iKONIC but I didn't get around to those (yet). 

    Tip: Rebuckle your boots after lunch for a better demo experience. ;))

    ISNE-I Skied New England | NESAP-the New England Ski Area Project | SOSA-Saving Our Ski Areas - Location SW of Boston MA
  • ciscokidciscokid expert
    Posts: 1,590
    So you haven't bought yet?

    4 yrs ago they could set my bindings( indemnified) but when I got them tuned a mo ago they aren't on the list anymore and can't touch the bindings.

    How long do bindings stay idemmnified?
  • ski_itski_it expert
    edited December 6 Posts: 1,805
    Not yet but aren't they gorgeous. image
    For bindings I don't know but I'm thinking there is no set time. http://www.skibum.net/do-it-up/gear-guide/indemnified-bindings/
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